Civilization Studies

CRES 24001-24002-24003. Colonizations I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This three-quarter sequence approaches the concept of civilization from an emphasis on cross-cultural/societal connection and exchange. We explore the dynamics of conquest, slavery, colonialism, and their reciprocal relationships with concepts such as resistance, freedom, and independence, with an eye toward understanding their interlocking role in the making of the modern world.

 

CRES 24001. Colonizations I. 100 Units.

Themes of slavery, colonization, and the making of the Atlantic world are covered in the first quarter.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This course is offered every year. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24001, HIST 18301, SOSC 24001

 

CRES 24002. Colonizations II. 100 Units.

Modern European and Japanese colonialism in Asia and the Pacific is the theme of the second quarter.

Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24002, HIST 18302, SOSC 24002

 

CRES 24003. Colonizations III. 100 Units.

The third quarter considers the processes and consequences of decolonization both in the newly independent nations and the former colonial powers.

Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24003, HIST 18303, SALC 20702, SOSC 24003

 

LACS 16100-16200-16300. Introduction to Latin American Civilization I-II-III.

Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence is offered every year. This course introduces the history and cultures of Latin America (e.g., Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean Islands).

 

LACS 16100. Introduction to Latin American Civilization I. 100 Units.

Autumn Quarter examines the origins of civilizations in Latin America with a focus on the political, social, and cultural features of the major pre-Columbian civilizations of the Maya, Inca, and Aztec. The quarter concludes with an analysis of the Spanish and Portuguese conquest, and the construction of colonial societies in Latin America.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 23101, CRES 16101, HIST 16101, HIST 36101, LACS 34600, SOSC 26100

 

LACS 16200. Introduction to Latin American Civilization II. 100 Units.

Winter Quarter addresses the evolution of colonial societies, the wars of independence, and the emergence of Latin American nation-states in the changing international context of the nineteenth century.

Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 23102, CRES 16102, HIST 16102, HIST 36102, LACS 34700, SOSC 26200

 

LACS 16300. Introduction to Latin American Civilization III. 100 Units.

Spring Quarter focuses on the twentieth century, with special emphasis on the challenges of economic, political, and social development in the region.

Terms Offered: Spring

Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 23103, CRES 16103, HIST 16103, HIST 36103, LACS 34800, SOSC 26300

 

EALC 10800-10900-11000-15400. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia I-II-III-IV.

Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This is a three-quarter sequence on the civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea, with emphasis on major transformation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present.

 

EALC 10800. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia I. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): G. Alitto     Terms Offered: Autumn

Equivalent Course(s): HIST 15100, CRES 10800, SOSC 23500

 

EALC 10900. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia II. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): S. Burns     Terms Offered: Winter

Equivalent Course(s): HIST 15200, CRES 10900, SOSC 23600

 

EALC 11000. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia III. 100 Units.

Equivalent Course(s): HIST 15300, CRES 11000, SOSC 23700

 

EALC 15400. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia IV. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): M. Bradley     Terms Offered: Spring Not offered 2013-14
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 15400, SOSC 23801

 

HIST 10101-10102. Introduction to African Civilization I-II.

Completion of the general education requirement in social sciences recommended. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. African Civilization introduces students to African history and cultures in a two-quarter sequence.

 

HIST 10101. Introduction to African Civilization I. 100 Units.

Part One considers literary, oral, and archeological sources to investigate African societies and states from the early iron age through the emergence of the Atlantic World: case studies include the empires of Ghana and Mali, and Great Zimbabwe. The course also treats the diffusion of Islam, the origins and effects of European contact, and the trans-Atlantic slave trade.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): AFAM 20701, ANTH 20701, CRES 20701

 

HIST 10102. Introduction to African Civilization II. 100 Units.

Part Two takes a more anthropological focus, concentrating on Eastern and Southern Africa, including Madagascar. We explore various aspects of colonial and postcolonial society. Topics covered include the institution of colonial rule, ethnicity and interethnic violence, ritual and the body, love, marriage, money, youth and popular culture.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): AFAM 20702, ANTH 20702, CHDV 21401, CRES 20702

 

JWSC 20001-20002-20003. Jewish History and Society I-II-III.

Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Students explore the ancient, medieval, and modern phases of Jewish culture(s) by means of documents and artifacts that illuminate the rhythms of daily life in changing economic, social, and political contexts. Texts in English.

 

JWSC 20001. Jewish History and Society I: Ancient Jerusalem. 100 Units.

The course will survey biblical, archaeological, and other early sources, as well as scholarly literature, to trace a history of ancient Jerusalem and to probe the religious significance of the city, its king, the temple that stood there, the activities that took place in and around it, and ideas that developed about it. Along the way, the course will model the modern, academic study of biblical literature, of the history and society of ancient Israel and Judea, and of religion.

Instructor(s): S. Chavel     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 20001, HIST 22113, NEHC 20401, NEHC 30401, RLST 20604, BIBL 31400

 

JWSC 20002. Jewish History and Society II: Jews in the Modern World. 100 Units.

Jews under Muslim Rule. The class covers Jewish-Muslim relations from the early Islamic state to the modern period. The history of Jews in Arab lands was typically told as either as a model of a harmonious coexistence, or, conversely, as a tale of perpetual persecution. Our class will try to read beyond these modes of analysis, by looking into particular contexts and the unique historical circumstances of a variety of Jewish communities whose members lived under Muslim rule. The class will explore the ways in which Jewish culture—namely, theology, grammar, philosophy, and literature—thrived, and was transformed, in the medieval and early modern periods, as a result of its fruitful interactions with Muslim and Arab cultures. Likewise we will study how liberal and communist Jews struggled to attain equal rights in their communities, and their understanding of various concepts of citizenship. Finally, the class will study the problems faced by Jews from Muslim lands as they immigrated to Israel in the 1950s. The class will discuss such concepts as “Sephardim,” “Mizrahim,” and “Arab-Jews,” as well as “Dhimmis” and “People of the Book” and investigate how their meaning changed in various historical contexts.

Instructor(s): O. Bashkin     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 20002, HIST 22406, NEHC 20402, NEHC 30402