Courses

Spring 2017 Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies Undergraduate/Graduate Courses

Undergraduate Courses

CRES 20140 Qualitative Field Methods (=CHDV 20140, SOCI 20140)

Description: This course introduces techniques and approaches to ethnographic field research. Emphasis is placed on quality of attention and awareness of perspective as foundational aspects of the craft. Students conduct research at a site, compose and share field notes, and produce a final paper distilling sociological insight from fieldwork.

Instructor: Omar McRoberts

Days/time: TTh 10:30-11:50 am

 

CRES 21201 Intensive Study: Chicago Blues (=ANTH 21201)

Description: This course is an anthropological and historical exploration of one of the most original and influential American musical genres in its social and cultural context.  The course traces the origins of the “Delta Blues” in the culture of African American sharecroppers of rural Mississippi, its transposition to Chicago during the “great migration” of the first half of the twentieth century, its development (in the bars and streets of Chicago’s Southside and Westside) into the tough, aggressive urban music that has come to be known as “Chicago Blues”, and its eventual spread to audiences outside the African American community.  The course examines transformations in the cultural meaning of the blues and its place within broader American cultural currents, the social and economic situation of blues musicians, and the political economy of blues within the wider music industry.

Instructor: Michael Dietler

Days/time: Th 6:00-8:00 pm

 

CRES 24002-01 Colonizations-2 (=ANTH 24002, HIST 18302, SOSC 24003)

Description: Modern European and Japanese colonialism in Asia and the Pacific is the theme of the second quarter.

Instructor: James Hevia

Days/time: TuTh 10:30-11:50 am

 

CRES 24003-01 Colonizations-3 (=ANTH 24003, HIST 18303, SOSC 24003)

Description: The third quarter considers the processes and consequences of decolonization both in the newly independent nations and the former colonial powers.

Instructor: Dan Slater

Days/time: TTh 10:30-11:50 am

 

CRES 24003-02 Colonizations-3 (=ANTH 24003, HIST 18303, SOSC 24003)

Description: The third quarter considers the processes and consequences of decolonization both in the newly independent nations and the former colonial powers.

Instructor: Emily Fransee

Days/time: TTh 1:30-2:50 pm

 

CRES 24003-03 Colonizations-3 (=ANTH 24003, HIST 18303, SOSC 24003)

Description: The third quarter considers the processes and consequences of decolonization both in the newly independent nations and the former colonial powers.

Instructor: Sean Brotherton

Days/time: MW 1:30-2:50 pm

 

CRES 24340/34340 Anthropology of the Psyche (=ANTH 24340/34340, GNSE 24340/34340)

Description: Through the readings in this seminar, we will explore the complex and divergent mechanisms through which human subjects come to understand themselves, their bodies, and the social worlds they inhabit. Specifically, we interrogate how the “psy disciplines” (psychiatry, psychology, and psychoanalysis) have produced an ensemble of institutions, procedures, tactics, and methods for making  "psychic" states of being legible. These "psychic" states blur the present, past, and future and intimately shape notions of health and wellbeing, as well as serve as anchoring logics for interpreting the relationship between mind, body, and spirit. Topics covered in the seminar include theoretical debates on global psychiatry; memory and trauma in psychiatric discourses; power and subject-formation, and the relationship between scientific knowledge, therapeutic systems, and society.

Instructor: Sean Brotherton

T 1:30-4:20 pm

 

CRES 24706/34706 Edo/Tokyo: Society and the City in Japan (=EALC 24706/34706, HIST 24706/34706)

Description: This course will explore the cultural and cultural history of Edo/Tokyo from its origins in the early seventeenth century through circa 1945. Issues to be explored include the configuration of urban space and its transformation over time in relation to issues of status, class, and political authority, the formation of "city person" as a form of identity, and the tensions between the real city of lived experience and the imagined city of art and literature. We will pay particular attention to two periods of transformation: the 1870s when the modernizing state made Tokyo its capital and the period of reconstruction after the devastating earthquake of 1923. Assignments include the writing of a final research paper of approximately 15–18 pages.

Instructor: Susan Burns

Days/time: TTh 1:30-2:50 pm

 

CRES 25405 Child Poverty and Chicago Schools (=PBPL 25405)

Description: This discussion- and debate-based course begins with a sociological and historical examination of child poverty, focusing on its origin, experience, and perpetuation in disadvantaged Chicago communities. Class meetings will involve debating school reform efforts, such as “turnaround” schools, charter schools, Promise Neighborhoods, and stepped up teacher evaluations. Further, the barriers that have contributed to the failure of previous reform initiatives—barriers that include social isolation, violence, and the educational system itself—will be identified and analyzed in-depth.

Instructor: Chad Broughton

Days/time: TTh 10:30-11:50 am

 

CRES 25950 The Psychology of Stereotyping and Prejudice (=PSYC 25950)

Description: This Course introduces concepts and research in the study of stereotyping and Prejudice. Topics include the formation of stereotypes and prejudice; the processes that underlie stereotyping and prejudice; stereotyping and prejudice from the target’s perspective; and prejudice and stereotype reduction. The course will cover a variety of groups (e.g. race, gender, weight, and sexual orientation) and explore the implications of stereotyping and prejudice across a number of settings (e.g. educational, law, and health).

Instructor: Jennifer Kubota

Days/time: W 9:30-12:20

 

CRES 26501 Imagining the International (=HMRT 26501, PLSC 20605)

Description: On a certain conception of the international, the world consists of a collection of sovereign, territorial states, facing off against one another in more or less warlike ways.  This course considers the origins of this imagined international, what work it does, and whether such a vision was ever accurate, and surveys alternate imaginings of political relationships beyond the sovereign nation state. The readings bring together classic texts in international political thought with more radical writings, and draw on secondary sources from both contemporary political theory and global history.

We begin from traditional texts, including Hobbes, Kant, and the so-called Westphalian consensus, to consider theories of the state and the rise of international law in relation to ideas of Enlightenment and of conquest. We then move roughly chronologically from the “age of empire” through contemporary politics, in order to consider the limits and conditions of the classic theories, their relationship to the reality of their times, and the political work they’ve done. We consider the role of transnational corporations and empires; abolitionism; class solidarity and the Communist International; race, pan-Africanism, and Third Worldist politics; and religion and the rise of international humanitarianism. We end with consideration of contemporary problems for sovereignty and imagined internationals, including climate change and the anthropocene, sweatshops and global economic justice, and the EU and rights of immigrants.

Instructor: Emma MacKinnon

Days/time: TBA

 

CRES 27508 Race and the Politics of Advertising in South Africa and Beyond

Description: In this class, students will examine how advertising participates in processes of racialization, as it links desirable modes of personhood to representations of consumers marked by differences of race. We will explore the case study of advertising in South Africa as a way to gain deeper insight into this process. Examining this context – which has a deep history of entanglements between constituting consumers through advertising, shaping notions of racial difference, and configuring political subjects – will provide us with the grounding to examine the politics of advertising as this relates to issues of representation more broadly.

In the first part of the course, students engage with the specific context of South Africa, reading texts that show how being a consumer and being a political subject came to be linked, and how such a linkage undergirded the racial inequalities of apartheid, with blacks excluded from participating both in the polity and in a consumer public. We examine how advertising participated in shaping the dynamics of this process, attempting to address blacks as consumers while avoiding challenging white supremacy. Moving into the post-apartheid period, we will read texts that illuminate the role of advertising in a context in which all have formal political equality, but unequal access to a consumer lifestyle. In most weeks of the course, the first class of the week will consider texts that deal with advertising, consumption and race in the context under discussion. In the second class of the week, we will engage with texts that lay out theoretical approaches to analyzing advertising, and we will use these to engage with actual examples of ads from the various time periods under discussion. In the last few weeks of the course, we will examine how the specific case of South Africa can elucidate the way linkages between race and consumer citizenship play out in the national context of the US, with its own history of articulation between consumption, politics, and social difference.

Instructor: Mary Robertson

Days/time: TTh 1:30-2:50 pm

 

CRES 27510 Latino Politics (=LACS 27510, PLSC 27510)

Description: The study of Latinos in political science is persistently reduced to a homogenously imagined and ideologically salient political community. This analytical lens is immersed in scholarship that advances electoral politics as the most elective means for Latinos to gain access and inclusion to dominant institutions. However, differences among Latinos, on the one hand, and the rest of the country, on the other, have altered our social and political realities. New sets of issues facilitate the public and private practices of racialization and xenophobia towards Latinos; which then challenge traditional conceptions of American citizenship, membership, rights and responsibilities. How can we reconcile issues of deep diversity when the current form of American electoral democracy fails to provide a mode of socially and politically incorporating Latinos?

This course will examine the role of Latino communities in shaping state and national politics in the United States. After we review their contemporary modes of political organization we will examine the political history and political organizational strategies of Latinos; analyze public policy issues surrounding citizenship and membership; evaluate the successes and failures of Latino empowerment strategies; and critique the electoral impact of Latino votes. Through this careful examination of Latinos in U.S. politics, we will develop a richer understanding of contemporary U.S. politics and will be able to develop some hypotheses about its trajectory in the 21st Century.

Instructor: Alfredo Gonzalez

Days/time: TTh 1:30-2:50 pm

 

CRES 27705/37705 Introduction to Black Chicago 1893-2010 (=HIST 27705, AMER 27705/37705, LLSO 22209)

Description: This course surveys the history of African Americans in Chicago, from before the twentieth century to the near present. In referring to that history, we treat a variety of themes, including migration and its impact, the origins and effects of class stratification, the relation of culture and cultural endeavor to collective consciousness, the rise of institutionalized religions, facts and fictions of political empowerment, and the correspondence of Black lives and living to indices of city wellness (services, schools, safety, general civic feeling). This is a history class that situates itself within a robust interdisciplinary conversation. Students can expect to engage works of autobiography and poetry, sociology, documentary photography, and political science as well as more straightforward historical analysis. By the end of the class, students should have grounding in Black Chicago's history and an appreciation of how this history outlines and anticipates Black life and racial politics in the modern United States.

Instructor: Adam Green

Days/time: TTh 12:00-1:20 pm

 

CRES 29200 Civil Rights/Civil Liberties (=LLSO 24000, PLSC 29200)

Description: This course examines selected civil rights and civil liberties decisions of U.S. courts with particular emphasis on the broader political context. Areas covered include speech, race, and gender.

Instructor: Gerald Rosenberg

Days/time: TTh: 1:30-2:50 pm

 

Graduate Courses

CRES 30001 Topics in African American History (=HIST 40001)

Description: This course is designed to explore in-depth selected topics in African American history and historiography. The specific focus this term will be "race and twentieth-century social science." Readings and discussion will explore the history of the relation between social-science theory and racial thought and practice from the race science of the late-nineteenth century through Franz Boas's cultural relativism to mid-twentieth century notions of a so-called culture of poverty. Our attention will focus on the real-world, especially public policy, implications of social-scientific thought. In addition to active participation in class discussions each student will write a final paper on a selected topic.

Instructor: Thomas Holt

Days/time: W 10:30-1:20

 

CRES 32300 Marxism and Modern Culture (=ENGL 32300, CMLT 31600)

Description: This course covers the classics in the field of marxist social theory (Marx, Engels, Lenin, Gramsci, Reich, Lukacs, Fanon) as well as key figures in the development of Marxist aesthetics (Adorno, Benjamin, Brecht, Marcuse, Williams) and recent developments in Marxist critiques of new media, post-colonial theory and other contemporary topics. It is suitable for graduate students in literature depts. and art history. It is not suitable for students in the social sciences. (20th/21st).

Instructor: Loren Kruger

Days/time: TTh 1:30-2:50 pm

 

CRES 33001 Censorship in East Asia: The Case of Colonia Korea (= EALC 43000)

Description: This course examines the operation and consequences of censorship in the Japanese Empire, with focus on its effects in colonial Korea. It begins with two basic premises: first, both the Japanese colonial authorities’ measures of repression, and the Korean responses to them, can be understood as noticeably more staunch and sophisticated when compared to any other region of the Empire; and second, the censorship practices in Korea offers itself as a case that is in itself an effective point of comparison to better understand other censorship operations in general and the impact of these operations across different regions. With a view to probing an inter- and intra-relationship between censorship practices among a variety of imperial/colonial regions, this course studies the institutions related to censorship, the human agents involved in censorship—both external and internal—and texts and translations that were produced in and outside of Korea, and were subject to censorship.

Instructor: Kyeong-Hee Choi

Days/time: T 1:30-4:20 pm

 

CRES 34340/24340 Anthropology of the Psyche (=ANTH3/24340, GNSE3/24340)

Description: Through the readings in this seminar, we will explore the complex and divergent mechanisms through which human subjects come to understand themselves, their bodies, and the social worlds they inhabit. Specifically, we interrogate how the “psy disciplines” (psychiatry, psychology, and psychoanalysis) have produced an ensemble of institutions, procedures, tactics, and methods for making  "psychic" states of being legible. These "psychic" states blur the present, past, and future and intimately shape notions of health and wellbeing, as well as serve as anchoring logics for interpreting the relationship between mind, body, and spirit. Topics covered in the seminar include theoretical debates on global psychiatry; memory and trauma in psychiatric discourses; power and subject-formation, and the relationship between scientific knowledge, therapeutic systems, and society.

Instructor: Sean Brotherton

T 1:30-4:20 pm

 

CRES 34706/24706 Edo/Tokyo: Society and the City in Japan (=EALC 34706/24706, HIST 34706/24706)

Description: This course will explore the cultural and cultural history of Edo/Tokyo from its origins in the early seventeenth century through circa 1945. Issues to be explored include the configuration of urban space and its transformation over time in relation to issues of status, class, and political authority, the formation of "city person" as a form of identity, and the tensions between the real city of lived experience and the imagined city of art and literature. We will pay particular attention to two periods of transformation: the 1870s when the modernizing state made Tokyo its capital and the period of reconstruction after the devastating earthquake of 1923. Assignments include the writing of a final research paper of approximately 15–18 pages.

Instructor: Susan Burns

Days/time: TTh 1:30-2:50 pm                             

 

CRES 37705/27705 Introduction to Black Chicago 1893-2010 (=HIST 37705/27705, AMER 37705/27705, LLSO 22209)

Description: This course surveys the history of African Americans in Chicago, from before the twentieth century to the near present. In referring to that history, we treat a variety of themes, including migration and its impact, the origins and effects of class stratification, the relation of culture and cultural endeavor to collective consciousness, the rise of institutionalized religions, facts and fictions of political empowerment, and the correspondence of Black lives and living to indices of city wellness (services, schools, safety, general civic feeling). This is a history class that situates itself within a robust interdisciplinary conversation. Students can expect to engage works of autobiography and poetry, sociology, documentary photography, and political science as well as more straightforward historical analysis. By the end of the class, students should have grounding in Black Chicago's history and an appreciation of how this history outlines and anticipates Black life and racial politics in the modern United States.

Instructor: Adam Green

Days/time: TTh 12:00-1:20 pm

 

CRES 44214 Gender, Health, and Medicine (=CHDV 44214, GNSE 44214, PBHS 31414, SOCI 40221)

Description: From the day we are born til the day we die, we experience a gendered world that shapes our opportunities, our social interactions, and even our physical health and wellbeing. This course will provide an introduction to sociological perspectives on gender, physical and mental health, and medicine while also providing a deep interrogation of the social, institutional, and biological links between gender and health. We will discuss inequalities in morbidity, mortality, and health behaviors of women, men, and transgendered individuals from different race, ethnic, and class backgrounds, and we will use sociological concepts, theories, and methods to understand why these differences appear. Finally, we will examine how medicine as an institution and medical practices as organizations sometimes contribute to and combat gender inequality in health. By the end of the course, you will be familiar with social scientific perspectives on (1) gender, (2) mental and physical health, and (3) the practice of medicine, as well as some of the fundamental debates in current medical sociology and sociology of gender.

Instructor: Anna Mueller

Days/time: T 9:00-11:50 am

 

CRES 62805 Colloquium: American Conservatism, 1945-Present (=HIST 62805, AMER 62805, GNSE 62805)

Description: This course explores the burgeoning historiography of American conservatism, tracing the movement from its grassroots origins after World War II to its institutionalization and militarization in the Reagan era to the rise of evangelicalism and Tea Party politics. We will focus on the role of women in the movement, the ideological alliances in its founding, and the roles of particular conservative groups in the movement's history. This course will move both chronologically and thematically to explore fundamental questions about activism and radicalization, grassroots and top-down ideologies, and the impact of conservative thought and institutions upon American society and state in the late twentieth century.

Instructor: Kathleen Belew

Days/time: M 12:30-3:20 pm