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The Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture (CSRPC) is an interdisciplinary program dedicated to promoting engaged scholarship and debate around the topics of race and ethnicity.

Please consider supporting the work we do by making a gift today!

This year, we embark on our celebration of the twentieth anniversary of the Center’s founding conference. From its inception, faculty, students, and staff involved with the Center have been committed to establishing a new type of research institute, one devoted to the study of race and ethnicity that moves beyond the traditional black/white paradigm while exploring social and identity cleavage within racialized communities.

Broadly, our research program encourages the study of race and processes of racialization in comparative and transnational frameworks. Thus, the work of our faculty affiliates ranges from an examination of processes of racialization among dominate groups to the study of racialized minorities within the United States and black and/or indigenous populations in Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, the Asian Pacific, and Europe.

We seek to foster interdisciplinary research, teaching, and public debate among students and faculty around issues of race and ethnicity through the following programs and initiatives:

  • Working with our faculty affiliates who endeavor to make race and ethnicity central topics of intellectual investigation at the University of Chicago by providing administrative and financial support for their scholarship, and supporting the next generation of diverse scholars in the academy through the Provost’s Career Enhancement Postdoctoral Scholarships.
  • Engaging the University and surrounding communities through public events and programs, such as faculty mini-conferences, lectures, workshops, panel discussions, and performances, as well as an artist-in-residence program in collaboration with the University’s Arts + Public Life Initiative, which hosts Chicago-based artists whose artistic practices engage matters of race and ethnicity.