Courses

CRES Courses 2017-18

Autumn Quarter

CRES 20305 Inequality in Urban Spaces (=CHDV 20305, PBPL 20305)

Course Description

The problems confronting urban schools are bound to the social, economic, and political conditions of the urban environments in which schools reside. Thus, this course will explore social, economic, and political issues, with an emphasis on issues of race and class as they have affected the distribution of equal educational opportunities in urban schools. We will focus on the ways in which family, school, and neighborhood characteristics intersect to shape the divergent outcomes of low- and middle-income children residing with any given neighborhood. Students will tackle an important issue affecting the residents and schools in one Chicago neighborhood.

Instructor: Micere Keels

Days/time: W 9:30-12:20

CRES 21335 Defining the “Afro” in Afro-Latin America (=ANTH 21335) Closed                                                              

Course Description

What does it mean to be Black in Latin America? Where do our understandings of race come from and do they translate across borders? Is the term “Afro-Latin America” redundant—could there be a Latin America without the “Afro”? We will tackle these questions and more as we consider the various ways in which countries throughout the Americas have remembered, acknowledged, and treated the contribution Africans and their descendants have given their local and regional cultures. We will begin by learning how nationalist projects and racial logics inform each other in specific case studies. Alongside class discussion, students will build the analytic toolset required to critically review of the documentary series Black in Latin America and the accompanying book. We will then analyze ways in which blackness functions the lived experiences of people throughout Latin America. As we grapple with the broader questions of the course, students will apply theoretical interpretations to case studies, assess and differentiate between various racial logics, and familiarize themselves with debates in the field of the African Diaspora in Latin America.

Instructor: Karma Frierson

Days/time: TTh 9:30-10:50

CRES 24001 Colonizations-1 (=ANTH 24001, HIST 18301, SOSC 24001)

Section 1                     François Richard        TTh 9:30-10:50

Section 2                     Stephan Palmié           TTh 2:00-3:20

Section 3         TBA                            TTh 12:20-1:50

CRES 24003 Colonizations-3 (=ANTH 24003, HIST 18303, SOSC 24003)

Section 1         TBA                            MW 3:00-4:20

CRES 25405 Child Poverty and Chicago Schools (=PBPL 25405) Cancelled

Course Description

This discussion- and debate-based course begins with a sociological and historical examination of child poverty, focusing on its origin, experience, and perpetuation in disadvantaged Chicago communities. Class meetings will involve debating school reform efforts, such as “turnaround” schools, charter schools, Promise Neighborhoods, and stepped up teacher evaluations. Further, the barriers that have contributed to the failure of previous reform initiatives—barriers that include social isolation, violence, and the educational system itself—will be identified and analyzed in-depth.

Instructor: Charles Broughton

Days/time: TTh 2:00-3:20

CRES 26513 Migration, Urbanization, and the Making of the Americas in the 20th Century (=HIST 26513)

Course Description

This course investigates cities in the Americas as "migrant cities," that is, the outcomes of the movement of millions of peoples across regions, borders, and oceans. We will consider three broad migratory movements: European migrations to cities such as New York and Buenos Aires between 1870 and 1930; internal migrations of people of African or indigenous descent from the US South to northern cities and from the Brazilian northeast to its southern industrial cities between 1930 and 1970; and, finally, the South-North migration from Mexico and Central America to the United States between 1970 and the present. By comparing these migratory movements, we will explore how migration has shaped twentieth-century megacities, asking, among other questions: Is the United States "melting pot" truly exceptional or has the whole continent been effected by movements of people across regions and borders? Have cities represented spaces of opportunity and liberation for migrants, or rather, are they sites where inequality and oppression have simply adopted a different form? What is the relationship between urban migration and twentieth-century understandings of race and culture? Is the presence of Latinos and Mexicans in US cities a new phenomenon or and old one? Does it represent a threat, an opportunity, or more of the same?

Instructor: E. Antuñano Villareal

Days/time: TTh 12:30-1:50

CRES 27512 Making Postcolonial Europe (=HIST 22106)

Course Description

Although it is more common to talk about formerly colonized territories as being postcolonial,

Europe is also shape profoundly shaped by its history of empire. This course will not only consider political systems, but also the ways in which colonialism shaped cultural production, economic structures, and shifting ideas about gender, sexuality, and race. Reading materials will include a range of primary documents (such as fiction, film, material culture, and art) as well as secondary historical analysis. An analysis of these texts and their historical contexts will enable students to understand a variety of factors relevant to the history of global colonialism, including technology, sexuality and gender, race, war and violence, labor, resources and development, modernity, and the state. Through a combination of discussion, reading, short lecture, and different types of writing, students will gain a general narrative of the history of the European colonialism and decolonization as well as the making of postcolonial Europe. Students will leave the course with a broad narrative of the history of European colonialism develop their capacity for critical analysis based in both text and context.

Instructor: Emily Lord Fransee

Days/time: MW 1:30-2:50

CRES 29519 Histories of Racial Capitalism (=HIST 29519)

Course Description

This course takes as its starting point the insistence that the movement, settlement, and hierarchical arrangements of people of African descent is inseparable from regimes of capital accumulation. It builds on the concept of "racial capitalism," which rejects treatments of race as external to a purely economic project and counters the idea that racism is an externality, cultural overflow, or aberration from the so-called real workings of capitalism. With a focus on the African diaspora, this course will cover topics such as racial slavery, labor in Jamaica, banking in the Caribbean, black capitalism in Miami, the under development of Africa, mass incarceration, and the contemporary demand for racial reparations.

Instructor: Destin Jenkins

Days/time: TTh 9:30-10:50

CRES 29800 BA Colloquium

Autumn 2017 courses that could count in the CRES major/minor

ENGL 26780 Anglophone Modernisms

Course Description

This course is designed as a survey of global fiction in the twentieth century. More specifically, it is a survey of Anglophone modernisms, or modern/modernist English literatures which are written in English even as they rely on non-English speaking contexts and figures. Through a primary, though certainly not unassailable, logic of historical development, the course engages the fictional-historical worlds of these modern novels and poems (Conrad, James, Yeats, Achebe, Naipaul, Gordimer, Ishiguro) in chronological order, and considers especially the literature’s relationship to the historical contexts it reconstructs. Film intertexts are also part of the course: Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now (1976) and James Ivory’s The Remains of the Day (1993). Major themes to be explored include, but are not limited to: media, travel, and cultural exchange; psychoanalysis; global, world war; the dissolution of empire, chiefly British and French; and new colonial frontiers of subaltern labor.

Instructor: Sophia Sherry

Days/time: TTh 11:00-12:20

FREN 22217 Anthropologie, litterature et societe: perspectives francaises et francophones

Course Description

Du naturalisme de Zola (France) à la littérature-monde de Mabanckou (Congo), en passant par l’exotisme de Segalen (France) ou la négritude de Senghor (Sénégal), la littérature de langue française est pleine de ces œuvres inspirées, voire imprégnées, de savoirs anthropologiques. Mais l’inverse est aussi vrai puisque, dès la fin du XIXe siècle, il n’est pas rare de voir les anthropologues s’intéresser à l’écriture littéraire comme moyen d’exploration, de découverte et d’exposition de problématiques propres aux sciences sociales. Ce cours d’introduction se propose d’aborder, à travers un nombre réduit de textes fondateurs (Rousseau, Gobineau, Firmin, Césaire, Lévi-Strauss, etc.), certaines des grandes questions sociopolitiques et culturelles (race, culture, nation, religion, etc.) qui ont poussé les écrivains et savants, aux XIXe et XXe siècles, à dépasser les barrières institutionnelles de leurs disciplines respectives. Il s’agira grâce à cette approche interdisciplinaire de comprendre comment la pensée des uns a pu permettre de réinventer la pratique des autres, et vice versa. Taught in French

Instructor: Bastien Craipain

Days/time: MW 1:30-2:50

JWSC 20223 Narratives of Assimilation (=RLST 26623, NEHC 20223, REES 37003, NEHC 30223)

Course Description

This course offers a survey into the manifold strategies of representing the Jewish community in East Central Europe beginning from the nineteenth century to the Holocaust. Engaging the concept of liminality—of a society at the threshold of radical transformation—it will analyze Jewry facing uncertainties and challenges of the modern era and its radical changes. Students will be acquainted with problems of cultural and linguistic isolation, hybrid identity, assimilation, and cultural transmission through a wide array of genres—novel, short story, epic poem, memoir, painting, illustration, film. The course draws on both Jewish and Polish-Jewish sources; all texts are read in English translation.

Instructor: Bozena Shallcross

Days/time: TTh 5:00-6:20

JWSC 20233 Jews and Arabs: Three Moralities, Historiographies & Roadmaps

Course Description

A distinction will be made between mainly three approaches to Zionism: essentialist-proprietary, constructivist-egalitarian, and critical-dismissive. This will be followed by an explication of these approaches’ implications for four issues: pre-Zionist Jewish history; institutional and territorial arrangements in Israel/Palestine concerning the relationships between Jews and the Palestinians; the relationships between Israeli Jews and world Jewry; and the implications of these approaches for the future of Israel/Palestine and the future of Judaism.

Instructor: TBA

Days/time: TTh 12:30-1:50

PLSC 21802 Global Justice and the Politics of Empire (=PLSC 31802) Closed

Course Description

Over the last four decades, political theorists and philosophers have transcended the nation-state form and taken their concerns about redistribution, democracy, and rights global. Though often not explicitly acknowledged, this global turn emerged just at the tail end of decolonization when political and economic crises from large-scale famines to authoritarianism and ethnic violence rocked the newly emerging post-colonial world. This course will examine how contemporary debates around global justice broadly construed interact and intersect with the legacies of imperialism and decolonization. In exploring questions of redistributive justice, global democracy, human rights, and humanitarian intervention, we will consider the following questions: (1) in what ways are debates about global justice responding to the legacies of imperial rule, (2) how are the historical and contemporary manifestations of international hierarchy challenged and retrenched, and (3) is contemporary cosmopolitanism an alibi for new forms of imperialism? This course is part of the College Course Cluster, Inequality.

Instructors: Adom Getachew, James Wilson

Days/time: T 2:00-4:50

Winter 2018

CRES 24001 Colonizations-1 (=ANTH 24001, HIST 18301, SOSC 24001)

Section 1                     Matthew Knisley        TTh 12:30-1:50

CRES 24003 Colonizations-3 (=ANTH 24002, HIST 18302, SOSC 24002)

Section 1         Kenneth Pomeranz     TTh 11:00-12:20

Section 1         Kyeong-Hee Choi       MW 1:30-2:50

Section 1         TBA                            TR 9:30-10:50

CRES 24813 South African Fictions and Factions (=CMLT 24813, CMST 24813, ENGL 24813)

Course Description

This course examines the intersection of narrative in print and film (fiction and documentary) in Southern Africa since mid 20th Century decolonization. We begin with Cry, the Beloved Country, a best seller written by South African Alan Paton while in the US, and the original film version by a Hungarian-born British-based director (Zoltan Korda), and an American screenwriter (John Howard Lawson), which together show both the international impact of South African stories and the important elements missed by overseas audiences. We will continue with fictional and nonfictional narrative responses to apartheid and decolonization in film and in print, and examine the power and the limits of what critic Louise Bethlehem has called the “rhetoric of urgency” on local and international audiences. We will conclude with writing and film that grapples with the complexities of the post-apartheid world, whose challenges, from crime and corruption to AIDS and the particular problems faced by women and gender minorities, elude the heroic formulas of the anti-apartheid struggle era.

Instructor: Loren Kruger

Days/time: TTh 2:00-3:20

CRES 25501 Race and Imperialism in the 20th Century (=PLSC 25501)
Course Description

The turn of the 20th C. marked the legal sanctioning of Jim Crow segregation in the 1896 Plessy v. Ferguson decision while the Scramble for Africa only a decade earlier had inaugurated a new era of imperial expansion. For W.E.B. Du Bois and others, these confluences indicated a singularity about the global experience of race in the 20th Century. Focusing on the period prior to WWII, this course is an effort at understanding this specificity through an engagement with the politicians, statesmen, activists, and intellectuals writing in the midst of “the problem of the color line.” The course exposes students to thinkers on both sides of the color line as we read Sir Frederick Lugard, the colonial administrator of Nigeria and a member of the League of Nations' Permanent Mandates Commission, alongside George Padmore, the anticolonialist of Trinidadian descent who played a central role in Ghana’s independence movement. To further our insights, we engage recent commentary by scholars who have sought to understand the racial formations of the 20th Century. The course aims are 1) to trace the processes—ideological, political, and economic—through which the Jim Crow color line became international and consider the reverberations of this internationalism, 2) to reexamine the crisis of WWI and the creation of the League of Nations in light of the “problem of the color line,” and 3) to trace the intellectual roots of a global anticolonial movement concerned with securing racial equality.
Instructor: Adom Getachew     

Days/time: T 2:00-4:50

CRES 26603 Democracy and the Immigrant in Classical Greek Thought (=PLSC 26603)

Course Description

Readers have long marveled at classical Greek thought’s ability to capture the enduring dilemmas of democratic life. But on the increasingly urgent issue of immigration, political scientists persistently bypass the Athenian democratic polis and its critics even though Athenians lived in a democracy that invited, but kept disenfranchised, a large number of free, integrated immigrants called “metics” (metoikoi). With this curiosity in mind, we seek to understand how ancient philosophers, dramatists, and orators saw the democracy’s dependence on immigrants to support its economy, fight its wars, educate its citizenry, and express a precarious way of living in the polis. On what grounds were metics excluded from citizenship? What do critics think citizenship comes to mean under such conditions? Can they shed new light on contemporary assumptions about the relationship between democracy and immigration? Readings of primary texts in translation will be paired with contemporary political theory, gender theory, and classical studies.

Instructor: Demetra Kasimis

Days/time: T 9:30-12:20

CRES 26619 Who Counts? What Counts? Racial Governance in 21st Century Latin America (=ANTH 23081, HMRT 26619)

Course Description

In 2015 for the first time in Mexico’s history, there was an official count of its population of African descent, leaving Chile as the only nation in the hemisphere not to do so. A year prior, Brazil introduced a quota system for all federal jobs, leading to new questions about who qualifies for these positions. These examples and more highlight a new era in Latin America that questions who counts—both literally as with censuses and figuratively as with affirmative action—as Afro-descended in a region characterized by racial mixture. In this course we will analyze the new turn toward racial governance as we grapple with the following questions. How does the racial governance of the 21st century upend or echo the racial governance of the colonial era? How does this new era affect our understanding of race and identity? What is lost and gained by counting people as black?

Instructor: Karma Frierson

Days/time: TTh 9:30-10:50

CRES 27517 Gender and Race in the Atlantic World

Course Description

This course explores the crucial role that gender and race played in the formation and development of Atlantic societies as a way to build a critical “genealogy of the present” and investigate the roots of persisting gender and racial hierarchies and inequalities in today’s societies. Focusing primarily on North America, the Caribbean, and West Africa, from the time of early colonial encounters in the sixteenth century to the present, the course examines how ideas about gender and race shaped significant developments across the Atlantic, such as colonial conquests and projects, the Atlantic slave trade, plantation slavery, nationalism, and postcolonial migrations. It posits gender, sexuality, and race as fluid categories that were repeatedly produced and reproduced to establish, legitimize, and maintain various regimes of power and social inequalities, while also shaping the meaning of citizenship, republicanism, and national identity. Just as importantly, it considers how women, blacks and mixed-race, and colonial subjects navigated and at times challenged the gender, racial, and sexual economies of the societies in which they lived.

Instructor: Caroline Séquin

Days/time: MW 3:00-4:20

CRES 27519 Race, Ethnicity, and Identity in and beyond South Asia (=HIST 26807)

Course description

Few parts of the world can lay claim to such a diverse array of ethno-linguistic, religious, and regional identities as South Asia. Not surprisingly, these identities have never been static. This course considers the modern history of ethnic, religious, and racial identities across South Asia with particular attention to their representation in literature and film. We will begin with the colonial-era “ethnographic” state and the development and reification of caste-, religion-, and race-based classifications. We will then shift to Independence, Partition, and South Asian diasporas. We will conclude with contemporary articulations of nationalism, with particular attention to the case of Kashmir. Throughout the course we will focus on the social and political means through which ethnic, racial, and other identity categories are constructed—including colonial re-articulations of caste and the creation of the so-called “martial races.” We will also pay attention to moments of trans-national comparison, for instance Ambedkar’s correspondence with W.E.B. Du Bois, and the relation between critiques of casteism and racism.

No prior knowledge of South Asian history is assumed. This discussion-based class meets once a week for two hours and fifty minutes per class.

 

 

CRES 28906 19th Century American Mass Entertainment (=HIST 28906, GNSE 28906, CRES 38906, HIST 38906, GNSE 38906)

Course Description                 

Popular culture filters, reflects, and occasionally refracts many of the central values, prejudices, and preoccupations of a given society. From the Industrial Revolution to the advent of feature films in the early twentieth century, American audiences sought both entertainment and reassurance from performers, daredevils, amusement parks, lecturers, magicians, panoramas, athletes, and photographers. Amidst the Civil War, they paid for portraits that purportedly revealed the ghosts of lost loved ones; in an age of imperialism, they forked over hard-earned cash to relive the glories of western settlement, adventure, and conquest in Buffalo Bill's Wild West. Mass entertainment not only echoed the central events of the age it helped shape them: from phrenology as the channel for antebellum convictions about outward appearance (and racial identity), to the race riots following Jack Johnson's boxing victory over Jim Jeffries. Many of these entertainment forms became economic juggernauts in their own right, and in the process of achieving unprecedented popularity, they also shaped collective memory, gender roles, race relations, and the public's sense of acceptable beliefs and behaviors. This lecture course will examine the history of modern American entertainment over the course of the long nineteenth century. Requirements include careful reading, active and thoughtful participation, and written assignments.

Instructor: Amy Lippert

Days/time: TTh 2:00-3:20

Winter 2018 courses that could count in the CRES major/minor

ANTH 22615 Indigeneity, Religion and the Environment

Course Description

Around the world, appeals to indigenous difference accompany contentious struggles over land, territory, and resources. While indigenous claims are often seen as strategic responses to shifting legal conditions, this course focuses on Andean practices of land and ritual as they shape, and are reshaped by, political claims to rights and resources. The course is divided into three parts: Indigeneity in the Andes, Intimate Politics, and Ecology and Insurgency. By way of close readings of contemporary ethnographic texts, we will explore Andean relations and attachments to places and things, from land to silver, water to oil. We will then ask how such relations and their politics advance or unsettle common assumptions about the environment, non-Western peoples, and culture at large. If land is approached as a living being to be cared for and nurtured through daily ritual labors, how are such practices sustained or unsettled in conditions of widespread ecological degradation, mineral extraction, or land dispossession? How are notions of living matter, earth spirits, or the agency of nature appropriated within or reconfigured by political claims to indigenous and environmental rights? Combining weekly discussions, reading responses, and a final paper, we will work collaboratively to track the generative ways that notions of indigeneity, religion, and environment are combined and recombined to forge a new terrain of politics.

Instructor: Mareike Winchell

Days/time: T 9:30-12:20

ENGL 27450 The Black Voice: 1880-Present

Course Description

Can race be heard? What makes a “black voice”? This course will examine how the black voice develops and is structured as something audible in American culture. From Justin Timberlake to Iggy Azalea, contemporary controversies over cultural appropriation have made us question the ethics of white artists capitalizing upon a proprietary “black” voice. But what does it mean to call a voice black, or say Obama “sounds white”? In this course, students will wade through several key historical moments including the post-Reconstruction rise of local color, dialect debates during the Harlem Renaissance, hipsters in the 1950s, and sonic absurdities in the contemporary. The aim of the course is to learn how sound collaborates with or at-times belies knowledge and assumptions on race derived from a language of sight and skin color. Students will read, watch, and discuss material from a variety of genres and mediums including poetry, sketch comedy, cartoons, stand-up, essays, sociology, and the novel. Key figures include Mark Twain, Paul Dunbar, Charles Chesnutt, Joel Chandler Harris, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Norman Mailer, Gwendolyn Brooks, Paul Beatty, Steve Harvey, Dave Chappelle, and Aaron McGruder.Key criticism and theory includes John Edgar Wideman, Franz Fanon, Houston A. Baker, Geneva Smitherman, Kenneth Warren, and Jennifer Lynn Stoever.

Instructor: Lauren Jackson

Days/time: MW 3:00-4:20

SOCI 20262 Pragmatism, Sociology and DuBois

Course Description

There is renewed interest in sociology in looking to pragmatism for insights as to ways of conceptualizing sociology as a form of study.  Here we want to look at the sociological work of W E B DuBois in the context of 19th century American sociology, social reform movements, and pragmatist philosophy.  Do we see a way of thinking about large scale social research that offers different orienting principles than those that have guided the discipline until now?  We begin with a review of Peirce, James, and Dewey, then turning to the context of social work by James Adams, and then examples of late 19th century American sociology. We then examine DuBois's sociological work, paying chief attention to the Philadelphia and Atlanta work.  We close with a comparison of DuBois's theory of race to that of Robert Park.

Instructor: John Levy Martin

Days/time: TTh 9:30-10:50

Spring 2018

CRES 20104 Urban Structure and Process (=SOCI 20104/30104, GEOG 22700/32700, SOSC 25100)

Course Description

This course reviews competing theories of urban development, especially their ability to explain the changing nature of cities under the impact of advanced industrialism. Analysis includes a consideration of emerging metropolitan regions, the microstructure of local neighborhoods, and the limitations of the past American experience as a way of developing urban policy both in this country and elsewhere.

Instructor: Forrest Stuart

Days/time: TTh 5:00-6:20

CRES 21915 Body of Rights: Women’s Rights and Human Rights in the 20th Century (=HMRT 21907, GNSE 21915)

Course Description

This course will consider the political, religious, and social debates in the United States and Europe over sex, marriage, birth control, abortion, and rape as a lens through which to understand the evolution of women’s human rights in the 20th century. This course will also explore the extent to which political debates over women’s sexual and reproductive rights have served as stand-ins for discussions over women’s rights and over women’s place in society more generally. How have governments used women’s fertility and status as mothers to expand or curtail women’s rights? What are the political, social, and cultural effects of legislating aspects of sex and reproduction—and, more pertinently, what are the effects of doing so on the human rights of women?

Instructor: Peggy O’Donnell

Days/time: TTh 3:30-4:50

CRES 24002 Colonizations-2 (=ANTH 24002, HIST 18302, SOSC 24002)

Section 1       James Hevia                    TTh 9:30-10:50

Section 2       Alice Yao                        MW 1:30-2:50

CRES 24003 Colonizations-3 (=ANTH 24003, HIST 18303, SOSC 24003)

Section 1       TBA                                 MW 3:00-4:20

Section 2       TBA                                 TTh 9:30-10:50

Section 3       Kaushik Sunder Rajan    TTh 12:30-1:50

CRES 25310 Extinction, Disaster, and Dystopias: Environment and Ecology (=SALC 25310, ENGL 22434, GLST 25310)

Course Description

This course aims to provide students interested in South Asia (Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Pakistan, Nepal and Sri Lanka) an overview of key environmental and ecological issues in the subcontinent. We will investigate the ways the environment, ecology and culture of this region have interacted with pre-colonial, colonial and national histories to shape the peculiar nature of environmental issues. Students will be introduced to these issues via the narrative and disciplinary resources that South Asian studies more broadly provide. Given the time constraint of 10 weeks we will consider three major concepts—“extinction”, “disaster” and “dystopia” to see how they can be used to frame issues of environmental and ecological concern. We will approach each concept as a framing device for issues such as conservation and preservation of wildlife, erasure of adivasi (indigenous) ways of life, environmental justice, water scarcity and climate change. The course will aim to develop students’ ability to assess the specificity of these concepts in different disciplines. For example: What methods and sources will an environmental historian use to write about wildlife? How does this differ from the approach an ecologist or literary writer might take? Students will analyze various textual forms: both literary and visual, such as autobiographies of shikaris (hunters), graphic novels, photographs, documentary films, ethnographic accounts and, histories.

Instructor: Joya John

Days/time: MW 3:00-4:20

CRES 25950 The Psychology of Stereotyping and Prejudice (=PSYC 25950)

Course Description

This course introduces concepts and research in the study of stereotyping and Prejudice. Topics include the formation of stereotypes and prejudice; the processes that underlie stereotyping and prejudice; stereotyping and prejudice from the target’s perspective; and prejudice and stereotype reduction. The course will cover a variety of groups (e.g. race, gender, weight, and sexual orientation) and explore the implications of stereotyping and prejudice across a number of settings (e.g. educational, law, and health).

Instructor: Jennifer Kubota

Days/time: W 1:30-4:20

CRES 27100 Egalité des Races dans la Francophonie (=FREN 27100/37100)

Course Description

La réflexion anthropologie sur la Caraïbe commence avec les premières explorations européennes au cours des 15e et 16e siècles. Tout comme lors du développement de la colonisation, puis du système esclavagiste inauguré par le Code Noir (1685), la question raciale s’instaure au cœur même de la revendication républicaine des esclaves et de l’indépendance haïtienne. C’est cependant au milieu du 19e siècle, période où triomphe l’anthropologie positive, que paraîtront deux ouvrages majeurs sur la question raciale: De l’inégalité des races (1853) de Gobineau et De l’égalité des races humaines (1885) d’Anténor Firmin, l’un des premiers noirs à être membre de la Société d’anthropologie de Paris. Le séminaire analysera ces deux ouvrages en rapport avec l’esprit et l’histoire des idées de l’époque en mettant en évidence, à travers les réflexions théoriques et les œuvres des Durkheim, Firmin, Gobineau, Hibbert, Joseph-Janvier, Madiou, Marcelin, Moreau de Saint-Méry, Renan, Saint-Rémy, Schœlcher, l’émergence croisée et progressive d’un formidable discours sur la race dans l’histoire, la littérature et la philosophie politique, tout au long de la deuxième moitié du 19e siècle. Taught in French. PQ: Undergrads must be in their third or fourth year.

Instructor: Daniel Desormeaux

Days/time: T 2:00-4:50

CRES 27515 Black Religion and the Criminal Justice System

Course Description

This course is an attempt at reading these discourses together in a manner that speaks to contemporary problems and tensions in black politics. Themes and issues to be considered include: how the historical relationship between African American Christian and African American Muslim- and Jewish political traditions can help us understand differences and potential convergences between the politics of black religion behind carceral walls and “on the outside”/“in the world”; how reflections on religion and the carceral state shaped early movements for criminal justice reform, the Civil Rights Movement, and Black Power; how gender and sexuality have influenced black religious activism; the politics of black atheism and secularism; the strange career of religious respectability politics; and theological critiques of mass incarceration. The final few weeks of the course will focus specifically on religion’s role in the contemporary black freedom struggle.

Instructor: Kai Parker

Days/time: TTh 11:00-12:20

CRES 27516 Pacific America: Migration, Empire, and Race

Course Description

How can historians imagine “Pacific America”? What constitutes the Pacific America, and when does its history start? How did U.S. expansionism and colonialism in the Pacific affect the lives of people living on the Pacific Coast, especially the migrants from across the Pacific? How could Asian American history engage with the history of the American Empire, and vice versa? This course explores these questions, along with the recent academic conceptualization of the “Pacific World,” from the moment the U.S. acquired territories adjacent to the Pacific Ocean to the post-WWII immigration reform. While fully benefitting from the “Pacific World/s” studies of late, this course is designed to view the Pacific more as an interactive rather than integrative realm, and proposes to examine the changing relationships of the United States with various nodes in the Pacific Ocean, rather than attempting an exhaustive study of the Pacific. It focuses on two themes that facilitated Pacific crossings to and from the United States, empire and migration. The overall aim of this course is to understand interdependence and complexities in the historical developments of empires and migrations in the Pacific.

Instructor: Minyong Lee

Days/time: TTh 3:30-4:50

CRES 27519 Queer, Quare, Ku’er: or queer of color critique

Course Description

Forthcoming.

Instructor: Omie Hsu

Days/time: TBA

CRES 27900 Asian Wars of the 20th Century (=HIST 27900/37900, EALC 27907/37907)

Course Description

This course examines the political, economic, social, cultural, racial, and military aspects of the major Asian wars of the twentieth century: the Pacific War, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. At the beginning of the course we pay particular attention to just war doctrines and then use two to three books for each war (along with several films) to examine alternative approaches to understanding the origins of these wars, their conduct, and their consequences.

Instructor: Bruce Cumings

Days/time: TTh 11:00-12:20

CRES 28703 Baseball and American Culture 1840-Present (=HIST 28703/38703, CRES 38703)

Course Description

This course will examine the rise and fall of baseball as America's national pastime. We will trace the relationship between baseball and American society from the development of the game in the mid-nineteenth century to its enormous popularity in the first half of the twentieth century to its more recent problems and declining status in our culture. The focus will be on baseball as a professional sport, with more attention devoted to the early history of the game rather than to the recent era. Emphasis will be on using baseball as a historical lens through which we will analyze the development of American society and culture rather than on the celebration of individuals or teams. Crucial elements of racialization, ethnicity, class, gender, nationalism, and masculinity will be in play as we consider the Negro Leagues, women's leagues, the Latinization and globalization of the game, and more.

Instructor: Matthew Briones

Days/time: TTh 12:30-1:50

CRES 29117 Theater and Performance in Latin America (= GNSE 29117, LACS 29117, SPAN 29117, TAPS 28479, CRES 39117, CNSE 39117, LACS 39117, SPAN 39117, TAPS 38479)

Course Description

This course is an introduction to theatre, performance, and visual art in Latin America and the Caribbean. We will examine the intersection of performance and social life by looking at performance practices in key historical moments in Latin America and the Caribbean. We ask: how have embodied practice, theatre and visual art been used to negotiate particular moments in Latin American history? We will study performances during independence, revolution, dictatorships, processes of democratization, truth and reconciliation, as well as the rise of neoliberalism. In our investigation, we will pay close attention to how ideologies of race, gender, and sexuality are articulated and disseminated within these performances at critical historical junctures. Our corpus may include blackface performance traditions in the Caribbean, indigenous performance, queer performance and we will look closely at the artistic works of Coco Fusco, Neo Bustamante, Las Yeguas del Apocalipsis, Yuyachkani, Griselda Gámbaro, and others. We will also read key theoretical work in Performance Studies including the work Joseph Roach, Richard Schechner, Diana Taylor, Jill Lane, and others. This course will be taught in English. PQ: Undergrads must be in third or fourth year.

Instructor: Danielle Roper

Days/time: TBA