Chrysanthemum Tran

May 14, 2018
6 PM - 8 PM
CSRPC, 5733 S University Ave

As part of the PanAsian Solidarity Coalition’s Spring Festival, please join us for a CRES talk program from Chrysanthemum Tran. There will be a small reception to follow.

Chrysanthemum Tran (she/they) is a Vietnamese-American poet, performer & teaching artist based in Providence by way of Oklahoma City. In 2016, she made history by becoming the first transfeminine finalist of the Women of the World Poetry Slam. Chrysanthemum is a 2016 Rustbelt Poetry Slam Champion & 2017 FEMS Poetry Slam Champion, as well as being awarded "Best Poet" at the 2016 National College Slam. Chrysanthemum is a Pink Door Fellow & the current lead teaching artist for the Providence Poetry Slam youth team.

The Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies (CRES) program presents a speaker series designed to bring to campus scholars whose work is relevant to coursework being taught at UChicago. Co-sponsored by PanAsia Solidarity Coalition, CSGS, and CSRPC.

Free and open to the public.
This venue is physically accessible and has a gender-neutral restroom. Please contact the CSRPC at 773.702.8063 with any questions or accommodation requests. Facebook event here.



Poetics and Performance in the Diaspora: A Conversation and Workshop with Josefina Báez

Feb 27, 2018
4:30 PM - 6 PM
Logan Center for the Arts, Room 603

Image may contain: 1 person

 

Josefina Báez (La Romana, Dominican Republic), is a New York-based storyteller, artisan, performer, writer, and educator. She is the founder and director of Latinarte/Ay Ombe Theatre (est. April 1986). An artist of intersecting identities and multi-faceted creativity, she is best known for her performance texts Dominicanish, Comrade, Bliss Ain't Playing and Levente no. Yolayorkdominicanyork, works that explore themes like racial and ethnic identities, global concerns, spirituality, and psychology.

Báez travels globally performing her work, conducting workshops and retreats on "Performance Autology," a system of art she created in which each participant fashions his or her own Autology. It approaches the creative process from the autobiography of the doer in order to create from a joyful and healthy place and space, following one's own inner guidance.

About CRES Talks:
The program in Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies (CRES) and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture (CSRPC) present a speaker series designed to bring to campus scholars and writers whose work is currently being taught at UChicago. This series invites current CRES majors and minors, interested students and members of the general public to join us for in-depth conversations—bringing topics discussed within the confines of the classroom into an open forum.

Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality; the Center for Identity and Inclusion; the Center for Latin American Studies; and the Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Student Committee.

The venue is physically accessible and has gender neutral restrooms. Please contact the CSRPC at 773.702.8063 with any accommodation requests or questions. Facebook event here.



Mehammed Amadeus Mack, “Sexagon” | Dec. 1, 2017

Dec 1, 2017
4:30 PM - 6 PM
CSRPC, 5733 S University Ave

Facebook

In contemporary France, particularly in the banlieues of Paris, the figure of the young, virile, hypermasculine Muslim looms large. So large, in fact, it often supersedes liberal secular society’s understanding of gender and sexuality altogether. Engaging the nexus of race, gender, nation, and sexuality, Sexagon studies the broad politicization of Franco-Arab identity in the context of French culture and its assumptions about appropriate modes of sexual and gender expression, both gay and straight.

Official French culture, as Mack suggests, has judged the integration of Muslim immigrants from North and West Africa―as well as their French descendants―according to their presumed attitudes about gender and sexuality. More precisely, Mack argues, the frustrations consistently expressed by the French establishment in the face of the alleged Muslim refusal to assimilate is not only symptomatic of anxieties regarding changes to a “familiar” France but also indicative of an unacknowledged preoccupation with what Mack identifies as the “virility cultures” of Franco-Arabs, rendering Muslim youth as both sexualized objects and unruly subjects.

The perceived volatility of this banlieue virility serves to animate French characterizations of the “difficult” black, Arab, and Muslim boy―and girl―across a variety of sensational newscasts and entertainment media, which are crucially inflamed by the clandestine nature of the banlieues themselves and non-European expressions of virility. Mirroring the secret and underground qualities of “illegal” immigration, Mack shows, Franco-Arab youth increasingly choose to withdraw from official scrutiny of the French Republic and to thwart its desires for universalism and transparency. For their impenetrability, these sealed-off domains of banlieue virility are deemed all the more threatening to the surveillance of mainstream French society and the state apparatus.

About the author:
Mehammed Amadeus Mack is Assistant Professor of French Studies at Smith College. His research focuses on contemporary immigration to France, gender and sexuality, diversity in the banlieues, and the relation between culture and politics. His larger teaching and research interests include Franco-Arab cultures, travel literature, the development French Islam and media studies.

The venue is physically accessible and has gender neutral restrooms. Please contact the CSRPC at 773.702.8063 with any accommodation requests or questions.



Thomas A. Foster “Rethinking Rufus: Sexual Violations of Enslaved Men” | May 14, 2019

May 14, 2019
4:30 PM - 6 PM
CSRPC, 5733 S University Ave

Facebook event

Join us for a talk on "Rethinking Rufus," the first book-length study of sexual violence against enslaved men. Foster’s sustained examination of how black men were sexually violated by both white men and white women makes an important contribution to our understanding of masculinity, sexuality, the lived experience of enslaved men, and the general power dynamics fostered by the institution of slavery. Rethinking Rufus illuminates how the conditions of slavery gave rise to a variety of forms of sexual assault and exploitation that affected all members of the community.

THOMAS A. FOSTER is an associate dean for faculty affairs and a history professor at Howard University. He is the author of Sex and the Eighteenth-Century Man: Massachusetts and the History of Sexuality in America and Sex and the Founding Fathers: The American Quest for a Relatable Past.



Seth Archer on “The Wasting Hand: Hawai‘i, 1840–55” | November 5, 2018

Nov 5, 2018
4:30 PM - 6 PM
CSRPC, 5733 S University Ave

Facebook event

Join us for a talk on the history of Hawai’i through the lens of Utah State University historian Seth Archer’s new book. Published in May 2018, “Sharks Upon the Land” examines the interplay between health, religion, and politics in the Hawaiian Islands between the 1770s and 1850s.

“CRES Talks” is a speaker series presented by the Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies program designed to bring scholars to campus whose work is relevant to the program coursework being taught. Presented by by CSRPC.

Seth Archer is a cultural historian of North America and the Pacific Islands. His teaching areas include early America and nineteenth-century U.S., Native America, American West to 1900, environmental history, and the history of medicine. From 2015 to 2017 he was the Mellon Research Fellow in American History at the University of Cambridge. His first book is Sharks upon the Land: Colonialism, Indigenous Health, and Culture in Hawaiʻi, 1778–1855 (Cambridge University Press, 2018).



Winter 2019


-

Thursday, January 24, 2019 

“‘Nasty Men and Ghetto Girls’: Blackness, Indianness, and Sexual Visibility Politics in the Caribbean Indian Party Scene” 

Anjanette Chan Tack | PhD Candidate in Sociology 

 

Thursday, February 7, 2019 

“Du Bois and Ambedkar: Race, Caste, and Comparing Pedagogies of Truth” 

Uday Jain | PhD Student in the Committee on Social Thought 

 

Thursday, February 21

“China White” 

Maya Singhal | MA Student in MAPSS (Anthropology) 

 

Thursday, March 7, 2019 

“Shadow Governments: The Role of Unregulated Lending in Local Institutional Debt” 

 Meghan Wilson | Post-Doctoral Fellow in the Race and Capitalism Project 

 

Thursday, March 14, 2019 

“The Real Wages of Whiteness: Southern White Laborers and Slavery” 

John Clegg | Collegiate Assistant Professor in the Social Sciences and Harper-Schmidt Fellow 



Observing Whiteness: A Pop-Up Exhibit by Liliana Angulo Cortés


May 14, 2018 - June 8, 2018
CSRPC Community Lounge

Observing Whiteness

Liliana Angulo Cortés presents a mixed media exhibit that reflects on the constructions of race and the privilege of representation in the urban space and in the subjective realm. The exhibit contains works developed while the artists lived in Chicago. Race, representation and violence are the main issues connecting the objects. Free and open to the public.

 

About the artist:

Liliana Angulo is a multi-media artist from Colombia. Her work has been featured in individual and collective exhibits across the Americas, Asia, and Europe. In her work, Angulo has explored questions of the body and the image and their relationship to constructs of gender, ethnicity, language, history, and politics. She uses a variety of media including photography, video installation, sculpture performance, and sound.Her commitment to working with communities of African descent has led her to use art to examine issues of representation, racial discourses, identity, performative practices, cultural traditions, and the politics of reparation.



Nov 9 | “The Wall of Respect: Public Art and Black Liberation in 1960s Chicago”

Nov 9, 2017
6pm - 8pm
CSRPC, 5733 S University Ave

free and open to the public; facebook event

 

Please join Editors and UChicago alumni Abdul Alkalimat, Romi Crawford, and Rebecca Zorach in conversation for the celebration release of The Wall of Respect: Public Art and Black Liberation in 1960s Chicago.

The Center for the Study of Race, Politics & Culture, Seminary Co-op Bookstores, Logan Center for the Arts, and Northwestern University Press proudly host this important discussion on one of Chicago’s most important contributions to public, social, and artistic justice.  

Through personal accounts and historic tributes, The Wall of Respect and its movement are brought back to life—once again re-entering the conversation on social justice and the power of public art.

 

About the book:  The Wall of Respect: Public Art and Black Liberation in 1960s Chicago is the first in-depth, illustrated history of a lost Chicago monument. The Wall of Respect was a revolutionary mural created by fourteen members of the Organization of Black American Culture (OBAC) on the South Side of Chicago in 1967. This book gathers historic essays, poetry, and previously unpublished primary documents from the movement’s founders that provide a visual guide to the work’s creation and evolution.

The Wall of Respect received national critical acclaim when it was unveiled on the side of a building at Forty-Third and Langley in Chicago’s Bronzeville neighborhood. Painters and photographers worked side by side on the mural's seven themed sections, which featured portraits of Black heroes and sheroes, among them John Coltrane, Nina Simone, Billie Holiday, Malcolm X, Muhammad Ali, and W. E. B. Du Bois. The Wall became a platform for music, poetry, and political rallies. Over time it changed, reflecting painful controversies among the artists as well as broader shifts in the Civil Rights and Black Liberation Movements.

At the intersection of African American culture, politics, and Chicago art history, The Wall of Respect offers, in one keepsake-quality work, an unsurpassed collection of images and essays that illuminate a powerful monument that continues to fascinate artists, scholars, and readers in Chicago and across the United States.

 

About the editors:  Abdul Alkalimat is an activist and the founding chairperson of the Organization of Black American Culture, which led the creation of the Wall of Respect in 1967. He is an emeritus professor of the School of Information Sciences and the Department of African American studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Professor Alkalimat received his PhD in sociology from the University of Chicago

Romi Crawford is an associate professor in the Department of Visual and Critical Studies and in the Department of Liberal Arts at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.  Professor Crawford received her MA and PhD in English literature, theory, and criticism from the University of Chicago

Rebecca Zorach is the Mary Jane Crowe Professor of Art and Art History at Northwestern University. Professor Zorach received her PhD in Art History from the University of Chicago.


Presented by the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture (CSRPC), the Seminary Co-op Bookstores, the Logan Center for the Arts, and Northwestern Press.

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This venue is physically accessible and has a gender-neutral restroom. Please contact the CSRPC at 773.702.8063 with any questions or accommodation requests.



Christelle Taraud, “‘Native’ Women on Stirrups” | May 25, 2017

May 25, 2017
4.30pm - 6pm
CSRPC / CSGS, 5733 S University Ave

free and open to the public; facebook event

Christelle Taraud, “'Native’ Women on Stirrups: Hygienic Discourse and Violence Through Photography in Colonial Morocco during the 1930’s”

This talk is based on a corpus of photographs representing prostitutes and published in a book on French medicine in Morocco during the 1930s. This series of images explored both the regulation of prostitution in colonial context, and the control and repression of prostitutes at the heart of hygienist discourses and racial segregation. The talk addresses in particular the violence contained in these images, from the trivialized use of naked "indigenous" to the invasive and mandatory medical inspections of prostitutes. It argues that the photographer himself participated not only to the construction of an apologetic discourse about French colonial medicine, but also to the degradation of "native" women, through the very act of photographing. As such, these images convey, just like written archives, masculine and colonial domination over prostitutes. Photography, then, constituted a key element in colonial ideology, as it helped to promote medical, moralist, and racist discourses. 


Professor Christelle Taraud is a historian of modern and contemporary Maghreb. Her areas of specialty include the history of women, gender, and sexualities in colonial contexts. She is a member of the Centre d'histoire du dix-neuvième siècle at the Universities of Paris I and Paris IV and the author of several monographs on the history of gender and sexuality in French North Africa, including La Prostitution coloniale: Algérie, Tunisie, Maroc, 1830-1962 (Paris Payot, 2003 and 2009); Mauresques: Femmes orientales dans la photographie coloniale, 1860-1910 (Paris: Albin Michel, 2003); Femmes d'Afrique du Nord: Cartes postales, 1885-1930 (Paris: Editions Bleu Autour, 2006 and 2011); and Amour interdit: Prostitution, marginalité et colonialisme. Maghreb 1830-1962 (Paris: Payot, collection Petite Bibliothèque Payot, 2012).
 
Organized by the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, with support from the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture (CSRPC), and the Center for Middle Eastern Studies. 

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This venue is physically accessible and has a gender-neutral restroom. Please contact the CSRPC at 773.702.8063 with any questions or accommodation requests.



“I Am Not Your Negro” Screening and Discussion | May 13, 2017

May 13, 2017
7pm - 10pm
Ida Noyes Hall (Max Palevsky Cinema), 1212 E 59th St

General Admission: $5
Quarterly Membership: $30 ($28 if you present proof of membership from the previous quarter)

Tickets go on sale half an hour before each screening. Quarterly membership passes grant holders free entry to all general admission films and can be purchased at the theater.

facebook event

Thirty years after the death of James Baldwin, Raoul Peck resurrects his unfinished final manuscript for a vital examination of race in America. Deftly editing between black representation in media and archival footage ranging from the past to the present, Peck highlights how Baldwin's words (narrated by Samuel L. Jackson) still apply to society today · (Raoul Peck, 2016).

Post-screening panel discussion with Jacqueline Stewart (Professor, Cinema and Media Studies), Paul Cato (Ph.D. Student, Social Thought), and Cecil McDonald, Jr. (Photographer, 2012-13 Arts + Public Life / Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture Artist-in-Residence). 

For more information >>

Presented by Doc Films and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture.

runtime: 95m format: DCP
 



Raul E. Moreno Campos on “The Rise of Authoritarian Neoliberalism under Donald Trump” | May 17, 2017

May 17, 2017
4.30pm - 6pm
CSRPC, 5733 S University Ave

facebook event; event photos

CRES Talks presents: Raul E. Moreno Campos on "Racial Capitalism, Populist Demagoguery, and the Rise of Authoritarian Neoliberalism under Donald Trump"

How to explain the rise of Donald Trump? Does his regime represent an anti-democratic turn in U.S. politics? This talk posits that the rise of Donald Trump is structurally rooted in the global economic crisis that onset in 2007-2008 and which was catalyzed by interrelated processes of de-industrialization and financialization that have accelerated since the 1950s. In turn, these processes created the fertile ideological terrain for the growth and dissemination of white nationalist populism that casts a racialized and historically marginalized sector of the working class, comprised in this historical moment primarily by Latinos and Black folk, as the cause of the crisis. Indeed, Trump's ability to mobilize white working class resentment against the racialized sectors of the industrial reserve army, blaming them for the loss of status and livelihood, not only allowed him to clench victory, but also to garner consent for the institutional and legal changes under his administration that signal the growth of an anti-democratic neoliberal state.

Raul E. Moreno Campos was born in San Salvador, El Salvador and lived there throughout the duration of the Salvadoran Civil Conflict (1980-1992). He settled in Los Angeles and attended public schools in the East San Fernando Valley. Moreno Campos holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from UCLA, where he has taught courses on race and politics in Latin America, Afro-American political thought, and inter-racial dynamics in U.S. society and culture. Prior to attending graduate school, Moreno Campos worked for MALDEF'S education department on projects related to equal access to education and empowerment in Latino communities. His fields of expertise include Afro American and Latin American Political Thought, Marxism, race relations in the United States, 20th century Latin American cultural and intellectual history, the politics of authoritarian regimes, and state-sponsored violence in the Americas. Moreno Campos is currently a Lecturer in Political Science and the University Experience Program at CSU Channel Islands.

This conversation is presented as part of the Spring 2017 course "Latino Politics," taught by Alfredo Gonzalez (PhD Candidate, Political Science).

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This venue is physically accessible and has a gender-neutral restroom. Please contact the CSRPC at 773.702.8063 with any questions or accommodation requests.



Hidden Movies: An Introduction to The South Side Home Movie Project | April 17, 2017

Apr 17, 2017
4.30pm - 6pm
CSRPC, 5733 S University Ave

free and open to the public; facebook event


An introduction to the work of one of the CSRPC's Faculty Projects-in-Residence - the South Side Home Movie Project (SSHMP) with Jacqueline Stewart (Professor, Cinema and Media Studies) and Candace Ming (Project Manager/Archivist, SSHMP). 

The South Side Home Movie Project is an archival and research initiative to collect, preserve and exhibit amateur films from Chicago’s South Side neighborhood. This project grew from the notable absence home movies (especially from minorities) in the canon of film scholarship which is only now beginning to change. The project also seeks to provide context and history for this historic neighborhood.

Supported by the University of Chicago's Center for the Study of Race, Politics, & Culture, the Film Studies Center, the Women's Board of the University of Chicago, and the Office of Civic Engagement's Community Program Accelerator the South Side Home Movie Project is both a film preservation project and a visual history of Chicago's South Side neighborhoods.

The South Side Home Movie Project was launched in 2005 by Jacqueline Stewart.


Presented by the South Side Home Movie Project and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture. 

Image Credit:  from the Lynette Frazier Collection. 

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This venue is physically accessible and has a gender-neutral restroom. Please contact the CSRPC at 773.702.8063 with any questions or accommodation requests.



Angela Jackson on “A Surprised Queenhood” | May 30, 2017

May 30, 2017
7pm - 9pm
Logan Center for the Arts Performance Penthouse, 915 E 60th St

free and open to the public; facebook event

Join us for a retrospective discussion on the cultural and political force of Pulitzer Prize–winning poet Gwendolyn Brooks, in celebration of her one hundredth birthday with Angela Jackson.  Jackson will be in conversation with Emily Hooper Lansana, storyteller and Associate Director of Community Arts Engagement, Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts. 

Gwendolyn Brooks is one of the American literary icons of the twentieth century. Mentored by Langston Hughes and Richard Wright from a young age, Brooks’s poetry offered a unique and powerful voice. It served as witness to the stark realities of urban life: the evils of lynching, the murders of Emmett Till and Malcolm X, and the revolutionary effects of the civil rights movement. She earned many accolades for her work, and in 1950, she became the first African American ever to receive a Pulitzer Prize.

As an acclaimed poet who took inspiration from complex portraits of black American life, Brooks gained notoriety as a cultural symbol and speaker of truths. And as a leader of the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and ’70s, her reputation flourished as a generous mentor to younger writers and activists.

A Surprised Queenhood in the New Black Sun delves deep into the rich fabric of Brooks’s work and world over nearly six decades. It is a commemoration of an artist who negotiated black womanhood and incomparable artistry with a changing, restless world—an artistic maverick way ahead of her time.

Born in Greenville, Mississippi, poet Angela Jackson is the fifth of nine children. She spent her early life in Greenville before moving with her family to Chicago’s Southside. Jackson earned a BA at Northwestern University, where she received the Academy of American Poets Prize, and an MA in Latin American and Caribbean studies at the University of Chicago. In Chicago, she became a prominent member of the Organization of Black American Culture.

Jackson’s free verse poems weave myth and life experience, conversation, and invocation. She is the author of numerous collections of poetry, including Voo Doo/Love Magic (1974); Dark Legs and Silk Kisses: The Beatitudes of the Spinners (1993), which won the Carl Sandburg Award; and National Book Award–nominated And All These Roads Be Luminous: Poems Selected and New (1998). She has also written several plays, including Witness! (1978), Shango Diaspora: An African-American Myth of Womanhood and Love (1980), and When the Wind Blows (1984). Her novel Where I Must Go (2009) won the American Book Award.

Jackson’s honors include a Pushcart Prize, TriQuarterly’s Daniel Curley Award, the Poetry Society of America’s Shelley Memorial Award, and grants and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Illinois Arts Council. Jackson lives in Chicago.

For a full listing of events celebrating the 100th birthday of Gwendolyn Brooks, please visit arts.uchicago.edu/brooks100


Presented by the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture (CSRPC), Beacon Press, Seminary Co-op Bookstores, and the Logan Center for the Arts.

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This venue is physically accessible. Please contact the Logan Center at 773.702.2787 with any questions or accommodation requests.



Kestnbaum Writer-in-Residence Reading: Edwidge Danticat |  May 3, 2017

May 3, 2017
6pm - 8pm
International House Assembly Hall, 1414 E 59th St

free and open to the public

Edwidge Danticat reads from her work.

Edwidge Danticat is the author of numerous books, including Claire of the Sea Light, a New York Times notable book; Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist; Breath, Eyes, Memory, an Oprah Book Club selection; Krik? Krak!, a National Book Award finalist; The Farming of Bones, an American Book Award winner; and The Dew Breaker, a PEN/Faulkner Award finalist and winner of the inaugural Story Prize. The recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship, she has been published in The New Yorker, The New York Times, and elsewhere. She lives in Miami.


Presented by the Kestnbaum Family Writer-in-Residence Program; the International House Global Voices Program; the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture; and the Committee on Creative Writing.

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This venue is physically accessible. Please contact the Committee on Creative Writing at 773.834.8524 with any questions or accommodation requests.



Rats, Roaches, and Resistance: Housing Activism Films | April 1, 2017

Apr 1, 2017
5pm - 7pm
CSRPC, 5733 S University Ave

free and open to the public; facebook event

Rats, Roaches, and Resistance: Housing Activism Films; a screening and conversation with Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

Many human rights organizations contend that housing is a fundamental human right, but a safe and affordable place to live is not a given in our society. Where Can I Live? A Story of Gentrification (Erik Lewis, 1984, 32 min., DVD) documents tactics used by tenants fighting gentrification in Park Slope, Brooklyn, in the early 1980s, while also putting on view the abusive practices of investor landlords. Social and Political Housing Scrapbook (10 min., courtesy of Media Burn Independent Video Archive), made in the early 1970s by Communications for Change, documents community activism in Chicago’s Uptown neighborhood over substandard housing. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Assistant Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University, author of From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation, will lead a discussion of the films and the historical and current issues they raise following the program.

Taylor’s research examines race and public policy including American housing policies. Dr. Taylor is currently working on a manuscript titled Race for Profit: Black Housing and the Urban Crisis of the 1970s, which looks at the federal government’s promotion of single-family homeownership in Black communities after the urban rebellions of the 1960s.


Presented by South Side Projections in partnership with Northeastern Illinois University's Inner-City Studies Major Club (ICSMC), based out of the Carruthers Center for Inner-City Studies (CCICS), and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics & Culture (CSRPC).  

The Inner-City Studies Major Club (ICSMC), based at the Carruthers Center for Inner-City Studies (CCICS), seeks to connect the Inner City Studies Education students with other like-minded students as well as to outside community members and groups. We seek to “uplift” those that want to work towards relevant and essential “uplift.”

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This venue is physically accessible and has a gender-neutral restroom. Please contact the CSRPC at 773.702.8063 with any questions or accommodation requests.



“A Song in the Front Yard,” an evening with Imani Winds | May 3, 2017

May 3, 2017
7.30pm - 10pm
Logan Center for the Arts Performance Hall, 915 E 60th St

6.30pm:  Discussion with the artists and CSRPC Faculty Affiliate Travis Jackson (Music)

$35 / $28 Faculty and Staff
$5 Students
Purchase tickets at ticketsweb.uchicago.edu

"When I start writing a poem, I don't think about models or about what anybody else in the world has done." – Gwendolyn Brooks

The brilliant and intrepid Imani Winds joins the citywide celebrations and pay tribute to Chicago poet Gwendolyn Brooks' centenary with this concert that honors artists who forge their own unique paths. The program includes works by Wayne Shorter and Jason Moran written for the Imani Winds, music by two of the Imani members, and world premieres of three works written for the occasion.

"strikingly virtuosic, immaculately tight, stylistically agile" – The Boston Musical Intelligencer
 

A Song in the Front Yard – An evening with Imani Winds celebrating Gwendolyn Brooks

Jeff Scott: Titilayo
Valerie Coleman: Suite: Portraits of Josephine
Wayne Shorter: Terra Incognita
Jeff Scott: Homage to Duke
Jason Moran: Cane

Also, new works by Courtney Bryan, Valerie Coleman, and Nkeiru Okoye

Presented by UChicago Presents and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, & Culture (CSRPC) as part of the Gwendolyn Brooks centenary celebration.



Rosenberger Medal Lecture: Kerry James Marshall “As Luck Would Have It” | May 15, 2017

May 15, 2017
7pm - 9pm
Logan Center for the Arts Performance Hall, 915 E 60th St

Widely considered one of the most important artists working in the world today, Kerry James Marshall, the University of Chicago’s 2016 Rosenberger Medal awardee, has created a body of work over his lifetime that has reoriented the canon of art and contemporary representation. Through lush and structurally complex paintings and other media he has told a story about race and American history that is at once unflinching and affirming. Awards and honors include a MacArthur Genius Grant, and serving on President Obama’s Committee on Art and the Humanities. Marshall has exhibited at major venues around the globe including Documenta (1997, 2007), the Venice Biennale (2003, 2015), and the Whitney Biennial (1997), among others. A major survey exhibition of his work, Mastry, opened at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago in 2016, which has traveled to the Metropolitan Museum in New York and will be on view at the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art Mar 12–Jul 3, 2017.

Presented by the Office of the President, the Department of Visual Arts, the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, & Culture (CSRPC), the Logan Center for the Arts, and UChicago Arts. 

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The Rosenberger Medal was established in 1917 by Mr. and Mrs. Jesse L. Rosenberger in recognition of achievement through research, in authorship, in invention, for discovery, for unusual public service, or for anything deemed of great benefit to humanity.

Nominations for the Rosenberger Medal are submitted and voted on by several faculty Ruling Bodies. Rosenberger Medalists are invited to receive their awards at the spring quarter convocation, and to give a public lecture or workshop during the following academic year.

2016

Kerry James Marshall, Artist

2015

Ashley Wheater, Artistic Director, The Joffrey Ballet

2014

Josephine Lee, President and Artistic Director, Chicago Children's Choir

2013

Jeanne K. Gang, Principal and Founder, Studio Gang Architects

2012 

Anne Bogart, Co-founder and Artistic Director of SITI Company

2010

Earl Von Freeman, Sr., Tenor Saxophonist and National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master

2006

William Kentridge, Artist



Transcending Boundaries: Research and Scholarship in an Uncertain Era | May 19, 2017

May 19, 2017
all day -
School of Social Service Administration, 969 E 60th St

Please join us for an inaugural interdisciplinary research symposium for underrepresented minority graduate students to be held on Friday, May 19, 2017. This conference is designed to highlight the work of underrepresented minority (URM) graduate students and postdoctoral scholars including all intersectional identities within the URM community at the University of Chicago. This event is student organized and sponsored by UChicagoGRAD, the School of Social Service Administration, the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture, the Chicago Center for Teaching, the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs, and UChicago Urban.

The theme of the symposium, “Transcending Boundaries: Research and Scholarship in an Uncertain Era,” encourages scholars to reflect on our current political and social climate and how that might affect our research and scholarship in the present as well as the years to come. We welcome scholarly proposals from all disciplines, time periods, regions, and locales. Graduate students and postdoctoral scholars of color at the intersections of all identities from all divisions are encouraged to apply.

The symposium will feature a lunchtime keynote address given by Eve Ewing, current Provosts Postdoctoral Scholar at the University of Chicago and incoming Assistant Professor in the School of Social Service Administration.

In addition to thematic panel discussions the symposium will host a Research Lightning Round. During the Lightning Round, scholars are given 3 minutes to present their research to an interdisciplinary audience. The lightning round is designed to give UChicago underrepresented minority scholars the opportunity to briefly share and promote their work in a low-stakes but high-energy setting.

Panel Themes

  • Resilience
  • Space, Place, and Time
  • (in)visibility
  • Transformation

Transcending Boundaries Conference website >>

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Organized by Jasmine Benjamin (Doctoral Candidate, Political Science) and Sonia Gomez (Doctoral Candidate, History)— Higher Education Interns For Graduate & Postdoctoral Diversity & Inclusion, with support from UChicagoGRAD, the School of Social Service Administration, the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture (CSRPC), The Chicago Center for Teaching, the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs, and UChicago Urban



Community Forum: Hate Incidents on Campus | March 29, 2017

Mar 29, 2017
4.30pm - 6pm
Center for Identity + Inclusion, 5710 S Woodlawn Ave

free and open to the public; facebook event

Please join us for a discussion about recent incidents of hate speech on the University of Chicago campus and responses to them. 

Revisit our February 2016 Teach-in on Racism and Activism here.  


Presented by the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, & Culture (CSRPC), The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs, the Office of LGBTQ Student Life, the Pozen Family Center for Human Rights, and UChicagoGRAD.

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This venue is physically accessible. Please contact the CI+I at 773.702.5710 with any questions or accommodation requests.



Caroline Light on “Stand Your Ground” | March 8, 2017

Mar 8, 2017
6pm - 7.30pm
CSRPC, 5733 S. University Ave.

free and open to the public; facebook event

Caroline Light (Harvard) on “Stand Your Ground: A History of America’s Love Affair with Lethal Self-Defense” with Jill Petty (Senior Editor, Beacon Press) and Marcus Lee (Doctoral Student, Political Science)

 

A history of America’s Stand Your Ground gun laws, from Reconstruction to Trayvon Martin

In the aftermath of the 2012 shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School, conservative legislators and school administrators shocked some observers when they proposed armed “public school patrols” to protect children. Yet this kind of “DIY security” activism predates the contemporary gun rights movement. As Caroline Light proves, support for “good guys with guns” relies on the entrenched belief that certain “bad guys with guns” threaten us all.
 
Stand Your Ground explores the development of the American right to “self-defense,” and reveals how the “duty to retreat” from threat was transformed into a selective right to kill. In her rigorous genealogy, Light traces white America’s attachment to racialized, lethal self-defense, from the original “castle laws” to the radicalization of the NRA.
 
A convincing treatise on the United States’ deadly ascension as the world’s first Stand Your Ground nation, Light shows how violent self-defense has been legalized for the most privileged and made the most marginalized more vulnerable.
 
About the panelists: 
 

Caroline Light is director of undergraduate studies in Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality at Harvard University.Prior to her arrival at Harvard, she worked at Duke University, where she taught courses in Gender and Sexuality Studies, First Year Writing, and in the Global Americas Focus Program. She also coordinated Duke's Institute for Critical U.S. Studies.

Light has a doctorate in history, with particular focus on gender, race, and sexuality in the U.S. South. Her teaching and research interests include transnational feminist histories; immigration; U.S. consumer culture; and intersections of citizenship, race, and sexuality in the United States. 

She is the author of That Pride of Race and Character: The Roots of Jewish Benevolence in the Jim Crow South, from New York University Press (2014). 

 
Jill Petty has worked in publishing for fifteen years, and joined Beacon in June 2015. She served as an editor-publisher for South End Press—working with Noam Chomsky, Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, bell hooks, INCITE: Women, Gender Non-Conforming, and Transpeople of Color, Arundhati Roy, and other authors—and as a researcher and editor for The Nation and Ms. Before joining Beacon, Jill was a writer-editor for Equal Justice Initiative, the Alabama-based legal nonprofit led by Bryan Stevenson. She is a writing instructor at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and a member of the Prison + Neighborhood Arts Project teaching collective.
 

Marcus Lee is a second-year doctoral student in Political Science at The University of Chicago, where he is a Ford Predoctoral Fellow, an American Political Science Association Minority Fellow and a Point Scholar. His research interests include race, gender and sexuality; American Political Development and political historiography; extra-systemic politics; and the bureaucracy. He is especially interested in black politics post-1968 – i.e. the emergence and development of different streams of black politics after King’s death; the production of historical narratives of the 70s, 80s and 90s; and the normative implications and political consequences of those narratives for our current moment. He is currently working on a separate project that traces the formative logic of Florida’s Stand Your Ground law. 

event photos
 

Presented by the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture and Beacon Press.

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This venue is physically accessible and has a gender-neutral restroom. Please contact the CSRPC at 773.702.8063 with any questions or accommodation requests.



Bronzeville Out: Gwendolyn Brooks | March 7, 2017

Mar 7, 2017
4.30pm - 6pm
CSRPC, 5733 S University Ave

facebook event; event photos

CRES Talks presents: “Bronzeville Out: Gwendolyn Brooks and the Reshaping of African American Poetry”

This panel will focus on Gwendolyn Brooks's influence, impact, and legacy for African American poetry in Chicago and beyond. Panelists will discuss Brooks's role as a teacher and mentor of younger black poets in Chicago; her place in Chicago's network of Black Arts Movement writing workshops; and her example to black poets throughout the US of using new literary idioms as a vehicle for political work. Panelists will offer their thoughts on the expanding geographical horizons of Brooks's work -- from Chicago's Black Metropolis to the Pan-African world -- by reflecting on Brooks's later poetry, which oscillated in scope between the local and the transnational.

Panelists include poets and performers Angela Jackson, Parneshia Jones, Quraysh Ali Lansana, and Ed Roberson.  

Organized and moderated by Andrew Peart (PhD candidate, Department of English Language and Literature) as part of the Winter 2017 course"Gwendolyn Brooks: Poetry and Politics."

Suggested readings: Walter Bradford, "Chicago Centennial or the Town Hall Meeting" (1976); Gwendolyn Brooks, "Boys. Black" (1972); Gwendolyn Brooks, "Children Coming Home" (1991); Gwendolyn Brooks, "The Boy Died in my Alley" (1975); and Carolyn Rodgers, "Song to U. of C. - Midway Blues" (1968).  

 

About the panelists: 

Born in Greenville, Mississippi, poet Angela Jackson is the fifth of nine children. She spent her early life in Greenville before moving with her family to Chicago’s Southside. Jackson earned a BA at Northwestern University, where she received the Academy of American Poets Prize, and an MA in Latin American and Caribbean studies at the University of Chicago. In Chicago, she became a prominent member of the Organization of Black American Culture.

Jackson’s free verse poems weave myth and life experience, conversation, and invocation. She is the author of numerous collections of poetry, including Voo Doo/Love Magic (1974); Dark Legs and Silk Kisses: The Beatitudes of the Spinners (1993), which won the Carl Sandburg Award; and National Book Award–nominated And All These Roads Be Luminous: Poems Selected and New (1998). She has also written several plays, including Witness! (1978), Shango Diaspora: An African-American Myth of Womanhood and Love (1980), and When the Wind Blows (1984). Her novel Where I Must Go (2009) won the American Book Award.
 
Jackson’s honors include a Pushcart Prize, TriQuarterly’s Daniel Curley Award, the Poetry Society of America’s Shelley Memorial Award, and grants and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Illinois Arts Council. Jackson lives in Chicago.

 

Parneshia Jones studied creative writing at Chicago State University and earned an MFA from Spalding University. Her first book is Vessel (2015), and her poems have been published in anthologies such as The Ringing Ear: Black Poets Lean South (2007), Poetry Speaks Who I Am (2010), and She Walks in Beauty: A Woman’s Journey Through Poems (2011), edited by Caroline Kennedy. Jones’s poems have been featured on Chicago Public Radio, and she is a member of Affrilachian Poets, a collective of black poets from Appalachia.
 
The recipient of a Gwendolyn Brooks Poetry Award, a Margaret Walker Short Story Award, and an Aquarius Press Legacy Award, Jones has received commissions from such organizations as Art for Humanity in South Africa and Shorefront Legacy in Chicago and performed her work internationally. She serves on the boards of Cave Canem and the Guild Complex and the advisory board for UniVerse: A United Nations of Poetry. She is the sales and subsidiary rights manager and poetry editor at Northwestern University Press.

 

Quraysh Ali Lansana is author of eight poetry books, three textbooks, three children's books, editor of eight anthologies, and coauthor of a book of pedagogy. He is a faculty member of the Writing Program of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a former faculty member of the Drama Division of The Juilliard School. Lansana served as Director of the Gwendolyn Brooks Center for Black Literature and Creative Writing at Chicago State University from 2002-2011, where he was also Associate Professor of English/Creative Writing until 2014. Our Difficult Sunlight: A Guide to Poetry, Literacy & Social Justice in Classroom & Community (with Georgia A. Popoff) was published in March 2011 by Teachers & Writers Collaborative and was a 2012 NAACP Image Award nominee. His most recent books include Revise the Psalm: Work Celebrating the Writings of Gwendolyn Brooks w/Sandra Jackson-Opoku (Curbside Splendor, 2017); A Gift from Greensboro (Penny Candy Books, 2016); The BreakBeat Poets: New American Poetry in the Age of Hip Hop w/Kevin Coval and Nate Marshall (Haymarket Books, 2015) and The Walmart Republic w/ Christopher Stewart (Mongrel Empire Press, 2014). Forthcoming titles include: The Whiskey of Our Discontent: Gwendolyn Brooks as Conscience & Change Agent, w/Georgia A. Popoff (Haymarket Books, 2017), and; Clara Luper: The Woman Who Rallied the Children w/Julie Dill (Oklahoma Hall of Fame Press, 2017).

 

Born and raised in Pittsburgh, Ed Roberson studied painting in his youth and was educated at the University of Pittsburgh. His extensive travels inform his work, which is also influenced by spirituals and the blues, and by visual art, such as the mixed-media collages of Romare Bearden. Poet and critic Michael Palmer has called Roberson “one of the most deeply innovative and critically acute voices of our time.”

Roberson is the author of ten books of poetry, including the chapbook Closer Pronunciation (Northwestern University Press, 2013) and the collection To See the Earth before the End of the World (Wesleyan University Press, 2010). An earlier collection, Atmosphere Conditions (Green Integer, 2000), was selected for the National Poetry Series and nominated for the Lenore Marshall Award from the Academy of American Poets. He is the recipient of the 2016 Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize from the Poetry Foundation and the 2008 Shelley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America.

Roberson lives in Chicago, where he has taught classes and workshops at the University of Chicago, Columbia College, and Northwestern University. He has served as an instructor at the Cave Canem Retreat for Black Writers and as the Holloway Visiting Professor at the University of California, Berkeley. He is Distinguished Lecturer Emeritus at Northwestern University.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

From left to right:  Carolyn Cunningham; Carolyn Rodgers; Sharon Scott; Johari Amini; Mike Cook; Gwendolyn Brooks; Walter Bradford; and Haki Madhubuti. 
Photographer:  Roy Lewis

 

This program is presented as part of the city-wide celebration of Gwendolyn Brooks, Our Miss Brooks: A Centennial Celebration (OMB100), and UChicago's 2017 tribute, Centennial Brooks

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This venue is physically accessible and has a gender-neutral restroom. Please contact the CSRPC at 773.702.8063 with any questions or accommodation requests.



Su’ad Abdul Khabeer on “Muslim Cool” | February 8, 2017

Feb 8, 2017
6pm - 8pm
Seminary Co-op Bookstore, 5751 S Woodlawn Ave

free and open to the public; rsvp

 

Su’ad Abdul Khabeer (Purdue) on “Muslim Cool: Race, Religion, and Hip Hop in the United States” with Alireza Doostar (Divinity School)

This groundbreaking study of race, religion and popular culture in the 21st century United States focuses on a new concept, “Muslim Cool.” Muslim Cool is a way of being an American Muslim—displayed in ideas, dress, social activism in the ’hood, and in complex relationships to state power. Constructed through hip hop and the performance of Blackness, Muslim Cool is a way of engaging with the Black American experience by both Black and non-Black young Muslims that challenges racist norms in the U.S. as well as dominant ethnic and religious structures within American Muslim communities. 

Drawing on over two years of ethnographic research, Su'ad Abdul Khabeer illuminates the ways in which young and multiethnic U.S. Muslims draw on Blackness to construct their identities as Muslims. This is a form of critical Muslim self-making that builds on interconnections and intersections, rather than divisions between “Black” and “Muslim.” Thus, by countering the notion that Blackness and the Muslim experience are fundamentally different, Muslim Cool poses a critical challenge to dominant ideas that Muslims are “foreign” to the United States and puts Blackness at the center of the study of American Islam. Yet Muslim Cool also demonstrates that connections to Blackness made through hip hop are critical and contested—critical because they push back against the pervasive phenomenon of anti-Blackness and contested because questions of race, class, gender, and nationality continue to complicate self-making in the United States.

About the author: Su’ad Abdul Khabeer is a scholar-artist-activist who uses anthropology and performance to explore the intersections of race and popular culture. Su'ad is currently an assistant professor of anthropology and African American studies at Purdue University. She received her PhD in cultural anthropology from Princeton University and is a graduate from the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University and completed the Islamic Studies diploma program of the Institute at Abu Nour University (Damascus). Her latest work, Muslim Cool: Race, Religion and Hip Hop in the United States (NYU Press 2016), is an ethnography on Islam and hip hop that examines how intersecting ideas of Muslimness and Blackness challenge and reproduce the meanings of race in the US. Su’ad’s written work on Islam and hip hop is accompanied by her performance ethnography, Sampled: Beats of Muslim Life. Sampled is a one-woman solo performance designed to present and represent her research and findings to diverse audiences as part of her commitment to public scholarship.

In line with this commitment Su’ad leads Sapelo Square, the first website dedicated to the comprehensive documentation and analysis of the Black US American Muslim experience. She has also written for The Root, the Washington Post, The Atlantic, Ebony Magazine, the Huffington Post, Religious Dispatches and Trans/Missions, and has appeared on Al Jazeera English. Additionally, Su’ad is a Senior Project Advisor for the US Public Television award-winning documentary, New Muslim Cool and her poetry was featured in the anthology Living Islam Out Loud: American Muslim Women Speak

About the interlocutor: Alireza Doostdar teaches courses on social theory, modern Islam, and Iranian politics and history. He received his Ph.D. in Anthropology and Middle Eastern Studies from Harvard University. His first book, forthcoming with Princeton University Press, is titled The Iranian Metaphysicals: Explorations in Science, Islam, and the Uncanny. The book examines the rationalization of the supernatural “unseen” since the early twentieth century through scientization and campaigns against superstition. It argues that rather than diminishing the domain of the Islamic unseen, these practices have expanded and transformed it by making it commensurable with a range of modern Western esoteric knowledges and practices – including Spiritist séances and New Age therapeutic spirituality. Doostdar's other interests include Islamic spiritual cinema and the decades-old project of Islamizing the social sciences in Iran. 


Presented by the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture and the Seminary Co-op Bookstores.

This event is wheelchair accessible. Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate should contact the Seminary Co-op for assistance at 773.752.4381.



Jan 26 | Race Workshop: Vanessa C. Tyson on “Twists of Fate”

Jan 26, 2017
4.30pm - 6pm
CSRPC, 5733 S. University Ave.

free and open to the public; rsvp
 
The Reproduction of Race and Racial Ideologies Workshop presents Vanessa C. Tyson (PhD'08) on Twists of Fate: Multiracial Coalitions and Minority Representation in the U.S. House of Representatives.
 
About the book:  Members of Congress from racial minority groups often find themselves in a unique predicament. For one thing, they tend to represent constituencies that are more economically disadvantaged than those of their white colleagues. Moreover, they themselves experience marginalization during the process of policy formulation on Capitol Hill. 

In Twists of Fate, Vanessa C. Tyson illuminates the experiences of racial minority members of the House of Representatives as they endeavor to provide much-needed resources for their districts. In doing so, she devises a framework for understanding the federal legislative behavior of House members representing marginalized communities. She points to the unique ways in which they conceive of political influence as well as the strategies they have adopted for success. Black, Hispanic, and Asian Pacific American Caucuses, among other minority groups, have built cross-racial coalitions that reflect their linked political fate. This strategy differs considerably from competitive approaches often espoused at the local level and from the more atomized interactions of representatives at the federal level of the policy process. 

Tyson draws on years of personal experience observing and interacting with members of the House of Representatives in session, in their home districts, at functions sponsored by racial minority caucuses, and at White House events to illustrate her argument. Despite variation of experience and ideology within and amongst racial minority groups, she shows that representatives of minority coalitions have repeatedly and successfully worked together as they advocate for equality and social justice. She also points to a willingness among these coalitions to champion a non-discrimination agenda that extends beyond "traditional" issues of race and ethnicity to issues of class, gender and orientation. Twists of Fate provides a compelling model for understanding how diverse groups can work together to forge hopeful political futures.
 
About the author:  A social scientist by training, Vanessa Tyson currently teaches in the Department of Politics at Scripps College in Claremont, CA. Her courses include Black Americans and the Political SystemWomen and Public PolicyIntroduction to Public PolicyResearch Design; and Environmental Policy in the US.
 

Dr. Tyson’s first book, Twists of Fate: Multiracial Coalitions and Minority Representation in the U.S. House of Representatives (Oxford University Press, 2016), explores structural inequality in the United States, and how members of Congress have formed multiracial coalitions as a strategy to provide for their diverse constituencies.

As an expert on US Congress, policy formulation, race, gender, and social justice, Dr. Tyson has an extensive background in both US and California politics. Having worked on political campaigns since she was a teenager, including three Presidential campaigns, two US Senate campaigns, and numerous state and local campaigns, she carefully considers how political dynamics affect policy formulation and consequent outcomes. Tyson has been featured in US News and World Report, the Sacramento Bee, NPR, The Huffington Post, and The Bryan Callen Show.

Dr. Tyson spent years working as an advocate for sexual violence awareness and prevention, serving as one of the founding members of the Boston Area Rape Crisis Center Survivor Speakers’ Bureau, and starting a self-esteem/self-awareness program for female juvenile offenders through the Department of Youth Services in the State of Massachusetts.

Dr. Tyson has a bachelor’s degree from Princeton University in politics, coupled with a certificate in African American Studies, and a M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in political science.  She has won numerous awards for teaching excellence.

 

Presented by the Reproduction of Race and Racial Ideologies Workshop.  

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This venue is physically accessible and has a gender-neutral restroom. Please contact the CSRPC at 773.702.8063 with any questions or accommodation requests.



A Boal Workshop with Teresa Veramendi | February 4, 2017

Feb 4, 2017
10am - 1.30pm
CSRPC, 5733 S University Ave

free and open to the public; facebook event

Join us in an open space of dialogue and action aimed at devising tangible ways to fight the oppressive forces in our communities. Using Theatre of the Oppressed techniques, we will engage in embodied explorations of current events and brainstorm new solutions. Relating and resonating with one another's perceptions, and sharing the wisdom of our communal experience, we will rehearse our collective liberation.
 
While this is a creative and physical practice, no experience is necessary. All are welcome to participate and observe in the ways that best support their process. Augusto Boal - Brazilian theatrical director, theorist, writer, and teacher - created the practice of Theatre of the Oppressed as a democratic, activist, community-oriented social theatre practice.
 
About the Facilitator:
A graduate of the Tisch Drama Department at New York University, Teresa Veramendi also received her Master’s degree in Performance Studies from NYU while she performed and wrote theatre Off-Off- Broadway. Since co-founding Theatre of the Oppressed Chicago in 2012, Veramendi has facilitated over one hundred Theatre of the Oppressed workshops on diverse topics such as class, education, race, electoral politics, and career transitions, in various settings and cities around the country. Veramendi has established herself as a theatre maker, slam poet, teaching artist, community facilitator, and administrator in higher education.
 
Organized by Danielle Roper (2016-17 Provosts Postdoctoral Scholar) as part of the Winter 2017 course "Theatre and Performance in Latin America."  
 
Photograph by Sean O'Brien


Presented in partnership with the CRES Talks series of the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture, and Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Studies in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures.

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This venue is physically accessible and has a gender-neutral restroom. Please contact the CSRPC at 773.702.8063 with any questions or accommodation requests.



re:action // a day of resistance and rebuilding | January 19, 2017

Jan 19, 2017
2pm - 8pm
Ida Noyes Hall, 1212 E 59th St

Join the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture and The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality as we mark the inauguration of the forty-fifth president of the United States with RE:action - a day of resistance and rebuilding, an event designed to reconnect and reinvigorate our community by sharing resources and opportunities for political and social action and by celebrating our strengths, our power and our voices. 

The day will include:

2:00-5:00pm
AN ACTIVISM FAIR
Connect with local organizations and activist groups working on issues impacted by the national political climate and a Trump presidency; 

2:00-3:00pm
MOVEMENT, MEDITATION, AND MINDFULNESS
A free workshop facilitated by Lauren Ash, 2016-17 artist-in-residence with Arts + Public Life and the CSRPC  

2:00-8:00pm 
A BOOK EXCHANGE/FREE LIBRARY 
Bring a book/Take a book. Titles on radical politics, theory and history welcome. 

4:30-6:00pm
A film screening: American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs

6:00-8:00pm
An evening party with DJ Mr. Jaytoo

Visit bitly.com/uchicagoreaction for more information.

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COVERAGE

Jan 20, 2017  |  On- and Off-Campus Organizations Host Pre-Inauguration Activism Events - The Chicago Maroon



2016 Artists-in-Residence Panel Discussion + Welcome Reception | November 28, 2016

Nov 28, 2016
6pm - 8pm
CSRPC, 5733 S University Ave

Join us for a panel discussion featuring recently selected Arts + Public Life / Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture Artists-in-Residence Lauren AshStephen Flemister, and Yaw Agyeman (YAW).  The discussion will create an opportunity for each artist to introduce themselves and their practices, while also creating space for each to amplify their ambition for their time in residence at the University of Chicago, on the Arts Block, and in Chicago's Washington Park community.  The conversation will be moderated by Eve Ewing, Provost's Postdoctoral Scholar at the School of Social Service Administration and CSRPC Affiliate.  

The discussion will be followed by a Q & A and reception.  

 

About the featured speakers: 

Lauren Ash is the Founder and Creative Director of Black Girl In Om, a lifestyle brand focused on cultivating holistic wellness, inner beauty, and self empowerment for women of color. She is also a certified yoga instructor, wellness curator, and creative writer. She is passionate about building authentic and meaningful community amongst women of color, people of color more broadly, and creatives and inspiring all people to live by their intentions and chase after their curiosities with enthusiasm, faith, and vision.

Lauren’s work has been published in Design*Sponge, Blavity, and she has recently been featured in Nylon, The Cut, Teen Vogue, New York Magazine, and Elle.com. She is currently loving all things sports luxe, red wine, travel, and the monthly black joy centered day party she co-founded: Party Noire.

 
Stephen Flemister is an interdisciplinary artist working in sculpture, printmedia and new media, with practices invested in modes of portraiture, influences of digital culture and their common forms of application. Through objects, installations, and experimental studies, Flemister explores methods of visibility and fabricated realities, among social systems. Flemister received his BA in Interactive Arts and Media from Columbia College Chicago and his MFA in the Low Residency Program of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. His works have been shown at Hyde Park Art Center, Columbia College, South Side Community Art Center, and Arts Incubator with public installations and performance throughout Chicago.

 
YAW has performed on both the theatrical and musical stage. He has toured in the play Red, Black and Green: a blues (MAPP) and performed in the world premiere of the musical, "Mister Chickee's Funny Money" (Chicago Children's Theater). The play features music from the Motown Great, Lamont Dozier. He has been featured on VH1's "Soul Cities", a show produced by Nelson George that showcases singers in cities all over the country, as well as on the Africa Channel's, "Soundtracks at Red Kiva", a program that focuses on artists of African descent.  Currently, he is a member of the artistic collaboration, "Black Monks of Mississippi", headed by the dynamic and prolific, Theaster Gates.

 
Eve Louise Ewing is a sociologist of education whose research is focused on racism, social inequality, and urban policy, and the impact of these forces on American public schools and the lives of young people. She is a Provost's Postdoctoral Scholar at the University of Chicago; in 2018, she will begin as Assistant Professor in the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago. Currently, she is developing a book manuscript based on her dissertation, "Shuttered Schools in the Black Metropolis: Race, History, and Discourse on Chicago’s South Side," explores these topics in the context of the 2013 public school closures in Chicago, and the relationship between such closures and the structural history of race and racism in Chicago's Bronzeville community. 

Eve is also an essayist and poet. Her first collection of poetry, essays, and visual art, Electric Arches, is forthcoming from Haymarket Books in fall 2017. Her work has been published in many venues, including Poetry MagazineThe New YorkerThe AtlanticThe NationThe New RepublicUnion Station, and the anthology The Breakbeat Poets: New American Poetry in the Age of Hip-Hop. She has been a Pushcart Prize nominee, a finalist for the Pamet River Prize, and a scholarship recipient for the New Harmony Writers Workshop. She currently an editor and staff writer for the website Seven Scribes. She also co-directs Crescendo Literary, a partnership that develops community-engaged arts events and educational resources. Crescendo's projects include the Emerging Poets Incubator and the Chicago Poetry Block Party. Eve is one-half of the writing collective Echo Hotel, alongside Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib. 

 

For more information about the Artists-in-Residence Program, click here
 
This venue is physically accessible and has a gender-neutral restroom. Please contact the CSRPC at 773.702.8063 with any questions or accommodation requests.
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The Artists-in-Residence program, managed by Arts + Public Life and the CSRPC, is supported in part by a grant from The Joyce Foundation. 



Nov 4 |  Speakers’ Podium for Citizens and Non-Citizens

Nov 4, 2016
6pm - 7pm
The Muffler Shop, 359 E Garfield Blvd, Chicago

The Mobile Speakers’ Podium for Citizens and Non-Citizens, created by artist Jenny Polak, is imagined as a deployable speakers’ corner that is both functional and symbolic. The two halves of the Speakers’ Podium rely on each other. Suburban house collides with prison fence to invoke the needed voices and ever-presence of the incarcerated among the free in a country that locks up 2 million people. The Speakers’ Podium is inspired by the effective coalition of citizens and immigrants/non-citizens who fought successfully to block the building of a for-profit detention center by Corrections Corporation of America in Crete, IL. Weekly programming will feature activists, poets, student groups, prison abolition groups, performing artists, and individuals who through their practice engage with conversations around mass incarceration, immigrant detention, and citizenship.

free and open to the public; rsvp

 

FEATURED SPEAKERS

Diaz Lewis and Balas & Wax
Diaz Lewis and Balas & Wax perform a new work for four voices at the Mobile Speakers' Podium for Citizens and Non-Citizens November 4. This work explores a provision in the 2010 Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act—which includes a quota to detain 34,000 undocumented immigrants nightly—incorporating the bill itself, detainee interviews, intake documents, news reports, and other sources to question the humanity and unintended consequences of our current immigration policies.

Balas & Wax is the ongoing collaborative art practice of Susy Bielak and Fred Schmalz. Their work mines social histories, texts and archives—using poetry, ethnography, and multimedia production to create writing, installations, performances and public works. Their work has recently been presented at Experimental Sound Studio, Compound Yellow, and in the Lit & Luz Festival of Language, Literature, and Art. They are part of ThreeWalls’ current Research and Development Lab program cohort.  
Websites:  diaz-lewis.tumblr.com & balasandwax.com

 

Patricia Nguyen
Patricia Nguyen is an artist, educator, and scholar born and raised in Chicago, Illinois. As a child of refugees, her performance work is grounded in her family’s stories to critically engage with issues of forced migration, notions of freedom, inherited war trauma, state violence, memory, and healing. In her practice as a performance artist, she creates durational performances and devised theater that centers on oral histories of immigrants and refugees. Her performance installations play with the tactile and sensorial affects of audience witnessing and participation to explore the relationship between bodies, objects, and memory. She has performed at the Nha San Collective in Vietnam, the Mission Cultural Center in San Francisco, Jane Addams Hull House, Oberlin College, Northwestern University, University of Massachusetts Boston, and Prague Quadrennial. Nguyen has over 15 years experience working in arts education, community development, and human rights in the United States and Vietnam. She has facilitated trainings and workshops with The Fulbright Program, American Center at the US Embassy in Vietnam, Jane Addams Hull House, Social Workers Association in Vietnam, Asian Human Services, and 96 Acres. She is the cofounder and executive director of Axis Lab, a community-centered art, food, and design studio in Chicago. Patricia Nguyen is also a Ph.D. candidate in Performance Studies at Northwestern University.  
Website: patricianguyen.info

 

Jenny Polak
Jenny Polak makes site and community responsive art that reframes immigrant-citizen relations, amplifying demands for social justice. She examines detention centers, racial profiling, and strategies for surviving hostile authorities. Her work and site-specific projects have been exhibited widely and awarded support by NYFA, the Graham Foundation for the Advanced Study of Visual Art and Franklin Furnace, among others. She has held artist residencies including with the National Park Service, Newark Museum, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, and the Lower East Side Tenement Museum, and conceived the Speakers’ Podium for Citizens and Non-Citizens while she was Artist-in-Residence at Northwestern University.
Website: jennypolak.com

 

<< back to the Speakers' Podium series

 

This venue is physically accessible. Please contact Arts + Public Life at 773.702.9724 with any questions or accommodation requests.
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Project conceived by artist Jenny Polak, and organized by Arts + Public Life and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture at the University of Chicago.



“The Minority Paradox: Blackness in France,” with historian Pap NDiaye | November 10, 2016

Nov 10, 2016
6.30pm - 8.30pm
CSRPC, 5733 S University Ave

 

free and open to the public

A lecture by, and conversation with, Pap NDiaye, author and professor at the Institut d'Etudes Politiques de Paris. Post-lecture discussion will be moderated by Michael C. Dawson (Professor, Political Science, Faculty Director, CSRPC). 

Pap NDiaye is a historian, specializing in the social history of the United States with a focus on its minorities. He holds a doctorate from the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) where he was a lecturer before being selected in 2012 as Professor at the Institut d' Etudes Politiques de Paris (Sciences Po). NDiaye is a pioneer of "Black Studies" in French, and co-founded the Circle of Action for the Promotion of Diversity in France (CAPDIV) with Patrick Loze. He is currently working on a global history of civil rights in the 20th century.

event photos

 

This venue is physically accessible and has a gender-neutral restroom. Please contact the CSRPC at 773.702.8063 with any questions or accommodation requests.
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Organized by the France Chicago Center, with support from the Center for the Study of Race Politics and Culture at the University of Chicago, the Cultural Services of the French Consulate in Chicago, the University of Chicago French ClubFranke Institute for the Humanities, and the Alliance Française de Chicago



Oct 28 | Speakers’ Podium for Citizens and Non-Citizens

Oct 28, 2016
6pm - 7pm
The Muffler Shop, 359 E Garfield Blvd, Chicago

The Mobile Speakers’ Podium for Citizens and Non-Citizens, created by artist Jenny Polak, is imagined as a deployable speakers’ corner that is both functional and symbolic. The two halves of the Speakers’ Podium rely on each other. Suburban house collides with prison fence to invoke the needed voices and ever-presence of the incarcerated among the free in a country that locks up 2 million people. The Speakers’ Podium is inspired by the effective coalition of citizens and immigrants/non-citizens who fought successfully to block the building of a for-profit detention center by Corrections Corporation of America in Crete, IL. Weekly programming will feature activists, poets, student groups, prison abolition groups, performing artists, and individuals who through their practice engage with conversations around mass incarceration, immigrant detention, and citizenship.

free and open to the public; rsvp

 

FEATURED SPEAKERS

Aram Han Sifuentes
Aram Han Sifuentes uses a needle and thread as her tools to speak of her experiences as a first generation immigrant. Her works have been exhibited at the Wing Luke Museum of Asian Pacific American Experience in Seattle, Washington; Elmhurst Art Museum in Elmhurst, Illinois; Chung Young Yang Embroidery Museum in Seoul, South Korea; and the Center for Craft, Creativity and Design in Asheville, North Carolina. She currently has a solo exhibition at the Jane Addams Hull-House Museum (September 2016 – March 2017).

Aram was a 2014 BOLT Resident and 2015 BOLT Mentor at the Chicago Artists Coalition. She is a 2016 Smithsonian Artist Research Fellow and a 2016 3Arts Awardee. She earned her BA in Art and Latin American Studies from the University of California, Berkeley, and her MFA in Fiber and Material Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She is currently a Lecturer at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.  Website: aramhan.com

 

Sam Love
Sam Love is an artist, community organizer, and educator in Gary, Indiana. He co-founded 2-1-9 MIGHT, the Mass Incarceration and GEO Halt Team, and helped lead coalitions that stopped plans for a for-profit prison for immigrants in Hobart and Gary, Indiana. He was a co-editor and distributor of AREA Chicago and was a keyholder at Mess Hall. He was also a photographer for Tamms Year 10, a coalition of activists, artists, and elected officials who in 2013 successfully closed the Tamms Supermax prison in Illinois. He currently works with the Calumet Artist Residency and leads photography and poetry workshops in Gary.

 

Students Working Against Prisons
Students Working Against Prisons (SWAP) educate UChicago students about the prison-industrial complex, offer solidarity and support to prisoners, and end UChicago’s ties to prisons. We organize the Fight for Just Food, a campaign to stop UChicago from contracting with food service providers that profit from prisons.  

Website:  facebook.com/StudentsWorkingAgainstPrisons

 

Visible Voices ensemble (pictured above)
Visible Voices is Chicago Legal Advocacy for Incarcerated Mothers’ (CLAIM) peer support and empowerment group. The group, run by and for formerly incarcerated women, is dedicated to building our skills, creating humane policy change and to advocating for incarcerated women. Members of Visible Voices:

  • Support and empower one another as they transition back into the community and advocate for change.

  • Discuss and share information on local and national issues impacting the prison system and social justice movements. Build skills and confidence.

  • Discuss the impact of prison on themselves, their families and their communities. Promote change in state practices.

  • Break down stereotypes surrounding incarcerated women.

Visible Voices members take part in events and discussions designed to help them rebuild their self-esteem, to engage their point of view and leverage their experience, and to empower them to take action. Incarcerated and formerly incarcerated women are too often told that their point of view doesn't matter. Visible Voices reminds them that what they have to say is important and valued, and that they can make a difference.  Website: cgla.net/claim

 

<< back to the Speakers' Podium series

 

This venue is physically accessible. Please contact Arts + Public Life at 773.702.9724 with any questions or accommodation requests.
______________________________________
Project conceived by artist Jenny Polak, and organized by Arts + Public Life and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture at the University of Chicago.



Race & Capitalism Panel | November 17, 2016

Nov 17, 2016
4.30pm - 6pm
CSRPC, 5733 S University Ave

free and open to the public

 

The Race and Capitalism project presents a panel discussion with:
 
Virginia Parks (Madeline McKinnie Endowed Professor, Urban and Environmental Policy, Occidental College)
 
J. Phillip Thompson (Associate Professor of Urban Studies and Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
 
Kristy L. Ulibarri (Assistant Professor of English, East Carolina University)
 
MODERATOR
Michael C. Dawson (John D. MacArthur Professor, Department of Political Science and the College, Director of the CSRPC, University of Chicago)
 
 
 
For more information on the Race and Capitalism project, click here
 
This venue is physically accessible and has a gender-neutral restroom. Please contact the CSRPC at 773.702.8063 with any questions or accommodation requests.
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Organized by the UChicago Reproduction of Race and Racial Ideologies Workshop, with support from the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture.



Oct 22 | Speakers’ Podium for Citizens and Non-Citizens

Oct 22, 2016
1pm - 2pm
The Muffler Shop, 359 E Garfield Blvd, Chicago

The Mobile Speakers’ Podium for Citizens and Non-Citizens, created by artist Jenny Polak, is imagined as a deployable speakers’ corner that is both functional and symbolic. The two halves of the Speakers’ Podium rely on each other. Suburban house collides with prison fence to invoke the needed voices and ever-presence of the incarcerated among the free in a country that locks up 2 million people. The Speakers’ Podium is inspired by the effective coalition of citizens and immigrants/non-citizens who fought successfully to block the building of a for-profit detention center by Corrections Corporation of America in Crete, IL. Weekly programming will feature activists, poets, student groups, prison abolition groups, performing artists, and individuals who through their practice engage with conversations around mass incarceration, immigrant detention, and citizenship.

free and open to the public; rsvp

 

FEATURED SPEAKERS

Silvia Gonzalez performing with Michael De Anda Muñiz (pictured above)
Silvia Gonzalez is an Artist and Educator living in Chicago creating zines and curating workshops to address police violence, labor rights, imagination, play, freedom, and confinement.  She engages creative work with intergenerational participants interested in critically questioning and disrupting current power imbalances.  

Michael De Anda Muñiz is a Chicano educator/researcher who is currently a doctoral candidate in sociology at UIC. His work focuses on Latin@s, art, oppressive structures, and resistance.

Performers Silvia Gonzalez and Michael de Anda Muñiz are active members of the 96 Acres Project, an ongoing collaborative project lead by the Artist Maria Gaspar.The 96 Acres Project is a series of community-engaged, site-responsive art projects that address the impact of the Cook County Jail on Chicago’s West Side. The projects aim to generate alternative narratives reflecting on power, and to present creative projects that reflect the community’s vision of transformation. For more information: 96acres.org

 
bella BAHHS
bella BAHHS is a budding millennial leader, raptivist, public intellectual and scholar of popular US culture, contemporary social issues, gender and sexuality. Her work aims to foster a healthy, safe and empowering relationship between the producers of pop culture and the global Black population represented by their art and artifacts. Having earned a BA in communications from Dominican University, bella has a keen understanding of rhetoric and employs hip hop as a pedagogical tool to educate diverse, intergenerational audiences on the sociopolitical plight of Black people in the African diaspora and to provoke critical discourse around issues of concern to communities most impacted by police and state violence. While tapping into the rebellious nature of the hip hop community, she is revitalizing Black cultural vestiges of resistance and renaissance. Website: bahhsnotbars.com
Social media: instagram.com/bellabahhs / twitter.com/bellabahhs / soundcloud.com/bellabahhs
 
 
Matthew Epperson
Matthew Epperson is an Associate Professor at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration. His research centers on developing, implementing, and evaluating interventions to reduce disparities in the criminal justice system.  His primary area of focus is understanding and addressing person- and place-level risk factors for criminal involvement among persons with mental illnesses. Professor Epperson’s interests also include developing conceptual, evidence-based frameworks for effective and sustainable decarceration. His scholarship and teaching aim to build and advance the capacity of the social work profession to address these challenges and opportunities for criminal justice transformation.  Website: ssascholars.uchicago.edu/smart-decarceration-initiative
 
 
Malik Alim
Malik Alim is the Illinois Organizer at Roosevelt Institute. He is responsible for cultivating a diverse network of students and developing new Roosevelt chapters at colleges and universities. As a trainer, facilitator, and organizer, Malik provides students with the tools and resources to mobilize their peers around policy issues, build strong chapters, and develop conscientious leaders.

Malik has previously been involved in several grassroots campaigns in Chicago, including the demand for an elected Civilian Police Accountability Council (CPAC), the Chicago Police Torture Survivors Memorial, and the Coalition to Save Dyett High School. He also serves as the Chicago chapter Membership Co-Chair for the Black Youth Project 100, a national collective of young Black organizers. In his spare time, Malik enjoys taking road-trips, reading, and having spirited debates.

Social media:  twitter.com/MalikOrganizes

 

<< back to the Speakers' Podium series

This venue is physically accessible. Please contact Arts + Public Life at 773.702.9724 with any questions or accommodation requests.
______________________________________
Project conceived by artist Jenny Polak, and organized by Arts + Public Life and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture at the University of Chicago.



Oct 14 |  Speakers’ Podium for Citizens and Non-Citizens

Oct 14, 2016
6pm - 7pm
The Muffler Shop, 359 E Garfield Blvd, Chicago

The Mobile Speakers’ Podium for Citizens and Non-Citizens, created by artist Jenny Polak, is imagined as a deployable speakers’ corner that is both functional and symbolic. The two halves of the Speakers’ Podium rely on each other. Suburban house collides with prison fence to invoke the needed voices and ever-presence of the incarcerated among the free in a country that locks up 2 million people. The Speakers’ Podium is inspired by the effective coalition of citizens and immigrants/non-citizens who fought successfully to block the building of a for-profit detention center by Corrections Corporation of America in Crete, IL. Weekly programming will feature activists, poets, student groups, prison abolition groups, performing artists, and individuals who through their practice engage with conversations around mass incarceration, immigrant detention, and citizenship.

free and open to the public; rsvp

 

FEATURED SPEAKERS

Damon Locks performing with Roger Bonair-Agard (pictured above)
Damon Locks is a Chicago based visual artist, educator, vocalist/musician, and deejay. He attended The Art Institute in Chicago where he received his BFA in Fine Arts. Recently, he has been lending his artistic and/or teaching talents to organizations such as Prisons and Neighborhood Arts Project, Art Reach, the Center for Urban Pedagogy, and at UIC. The voices, the places, the stories, and the human exchange helps connect his work to the experiences of others, thus making the work stronger. He is a recent recipient of the Helen Coburn Meier and Tim Meier Achievement Award in the Arts and the 2016 MAKER Grant. He also just completed a music residency at The New Quorum in New Orleans. Website: damonlocks.com/art2

 

Jenny Polak
Jenny Polak is originally from England. Her art draws on her background in architecture and includes public and socially engaged projects such as architectural installations, drawings and useful commemorative objects. Her fictional firm Design For The Alien Within creates hypothetical hiding and dwelling places, symbolic lookout and counter-surveillance structures for people dealing with hostile authorities. Her family history of migration drives her work about citizen-non-citizen collaborations and accommodations and amplifying demands for social justice. She has completed collaborations and residency projects around the country and in 2012 was an artist in residence at Northwestern University, where she initiated the Speakers' Podium for Citizens and Non-citizens, inspired by community activism against the for-profit prison industry. Website: jennypolak.com

 

Cauleen Smith
Cauleen Smith is an interdisciplinary artist whose work reflects upon the everyday possibilities of the imagination. Operating in multiple materials and arenas, Smith roots her work firmly within the discourse of mid-twentieth-century experimental film. Drawing from structuralism, third world cinema, and science fiction, she makes things that deploy the tactics of these disciplines while offering a phenomenological experience for spectators and participants.  Smith was born in Riverside, California and grew up in Sacramento. She earned a BA in Creative Arts from San Francisco State University and an MFA from the University of California, Los Angeles School of Theater Film and Television. Smith is based in the great city of Chicago and serves as faculty for the Vermont College of Fine Arts low-residency MFA program and as visiting assistant professor at University of Illinois, Chicago. Her films, objects, and installations have been featured in group exhibitions. Studio Museum of Harlem, Houston Contemporary Art Museum; Yerba Buena Center for Art, and the New Museum, New York, D21 Leipzig and Decad, Berlin. She has had solo shows for her films and installations at The Kitchen, MCA Chicago, Threewalls, Chicago. She shows her drawings and 2D work with Corbett vs. Dempsey and kate Werble.  Smith is the recipient of several grants and awards including the Rockefeller Media Arts Award, Creative Capital Film /Video, Chicago 3Arts Grant, and the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, Chicago Expo Artadia Award, and Rauschenberg Residency. Smith was a 2016 Recipient for the Herb Alpert Awards in the Arts in Film and Video is the  2016 inaugural recipient of the Ellsworth Kelly Award. Along with Lana Lin, Smith co-programmed a series of experimental films  for Flaherty NYC Spring 2016. Website: cauleensmith.com

 

Maggie Brown

Maggie Brown is a Chicago native who made her professional acting and singing debut at the Body Politic Theater. She studied music, theater and voice at Columbia College and has traveled with her show, Legacy, which follows the history and evolution of African American music and covers a wide range of musical forms. The Chicago Music Awards nominated Maggie’s first CD, From My Window, for Best Jazz CD. A protégé of both her father, Oscar Brown, Jr., and Abbey Lincoln, Maggie has developed a unique vocal style that James Walker of jazzchicago.net describes as “transcend[ing] limitations and genres, while still maintaining her unique unmistakable voice.” Maggie has been featured at the Pritzker Pavilion in Millennium Park and with Orbert Davis’s Chicago Jazz Philharmonic at the Auditorium Theatre and the Logan Center for the Arts.  She can also be heard in clubs throughout Chicago.  
Website:  facebook.com/msmaggiebrown

 

<< back to the Speakers' Podium series

 

This venue is physically accessible. Please contact Arts + Public Life at 773.702.9724 with any questions or accommodation requests.
______________________________________
Project conceived by artist Jenny Polak, and organized by Arts + Public Life and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture at the University of Chicago.



Zadie Smith on “Swing Time” with Vu Tran | November 30, 2016

Nov 30, 2016
6.30pm - 8pm
DuSable Museum of African-American History

$30 (price includes book)

Zadie Smith presents her "ambitious, exuberant new novel" Swing Time. She will be joined in conversation by Vu Tran. 

 

About the book: Two brown girls dream of being dancers--but only one, Tracey, has talent. The other has ideas: about rhythm and time, about black bodies and black music, what constitutes a tribe, or makes a person truly free. It's a close but complicated childhood friendship that ends abruptly in their early twenties, never to be revisited, but never quite forgotten, either...

Dazzlingly energetic and deeply human, Swing Time is a story about friendship and music and stubborn roots, about how we are shaped by these things and how we can survive them. Moving from North-West London to West Africa, it is an exuberant dance to the music of t

About the author: Zadie Smith was born in Northwest London in 1975. She is the author of White Teeth, The Autograph Man, On Beauty, Changing My Mind, and NW.

About the interlocutor: Vu Tran, winner of a Whiting Award recognizing “exceptional talent and promise,” teaches creative writing at the University of Chicago. He is the author of Dragonfishnow out in paperback.

Presented by the Seminary Co-op Bookstore, with support from the DuSable Museum of African-American History, and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture, Committee on Creative Writing, and Office of Multicultural Student Affairs at the University of Chicago. 

This venue is physically accessible. Please contact the CSRPC at 773.702.8063 with any questions or accommodation requests.



Angela Davis on “Freedom is a Constant Struggle” with Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor | November 16, 2016

Nov 16, 2016
8pm - 9.30pm
Rockefeller Memorial Chapel, 5850 S Woodlawn Ave

free and open to the public
this event will be live streamed on Facebook

Activist, scholar, and author Angela Y. Davis will discuss her new book with author and activist Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor.


About the book: 
In these newly collected essays, interviews, and speeches, world-renowned activist and scholar Angela Y. Davis illuminates the connections between struggles against state violence and oppression throughout history and around the world.

Reflecting on the importance of Black feminism, intersectionality, and prison abolitionism for today’s struggles, Davis discusses the legacies of previous liberation struggles—from the Black freedom movement to the South African antiapartheid movement. She highlights connections and analyzes today’s struggles against state terror, from Ferguson to Palestine.

Facing a world of outrageous injustice, Davis challenges us to imagine and build the movement for human liberation. And in doing so, she reminds us that “freedom is a constant struggle.”

Angela Y. Davis is a political activist, scholar, author, and speaker. She is an outspoken advocate for the oppressed and exploited, writing on Black liberation, prison abolition, the intersections of race, gender, and class, and international solidarity with Palestine. She is the author of several books, including Women, Race, and Class and Are Prisons Obsolete? She is the subject of the acclaimed documentary Free Angela and All Political Prisoners and is Distinguished Professor Emerita at the University of California, Santa Cruz.


Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor writes on Black politics, social movements, and racial inequality in the United States. Her articles have been published in Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture and Society, Jacobin, New Politics, the Guardian, In These Times, Black Agenda Report, Ms., International Socialist Review, Al Jazeera America, and other publications. Taylor is assistant professor in the department of African American Studies at Princeton University.

Both authors' books will be available for sale from Haymarket Books. Book signing to follow.

event photos

 

This event is wheelchair accessible. Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate should contact the CSRPC for assistance at 773.702.8063.
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Presented by Haymarket Books, the Lannan Foundation and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture (CSRPC) at the University of Chicago.



May 3 | Racing the International: “American Empire”

May 3, 2017
4.30pm - 6pm
CSRPC, 5733 S University Ave

free and open to the public; facebook event

While the United States has long represented itself as an anti-imperial nation, its origins as an expanding settler colony, its forays into colonial rule abroad and its contemporary position as the hegemonic global power index the contours of an American empire. This panel will explore the relationship between domestic racial formations and imperialism abroad. 

A panel discussion featuring: Daniel Immerwahr (Northwestern University) Jeanne Morefield (Whitman College) and Aziz Rana (Cornell Law School)
 
 

Daniel Immerwahr is an assistant professor, specializing in twentieth-century U.S. history within a global context. His first book, Thinking Small: The United States and the Lure of Community Development (Harvard, 2014), discusses U.S. foreign aid and antipoverty strategies in the middle of the twentieth century. He is currently working on another book, How to Hide an Empire, about the United States and its peculiar relationship to overseas territory in the twentieth century. Besides U.S. foreign relations, he is also interested in intellectual history, the history of capitalism, and the methodological aspects of teaching and writing history. At Northwestern, he teaches courses on U.S. foreign relations, U.S. intellectual history, and global history.

Jeanne Morefield is Professor of Politics at Whitman College and a Professorial Fellow at Australian Catholic University. Her books include Empires Without Imperialism: Anglo-American Decline and the Politics of Deflection (Oxford, 2014) and Covenants Without Swords: Idealist Liberalism and the Spirit of Empire (Princeton, 2005).  She has published articles in Political Theory, History of Political Thought, Theory and Event, and other journals as well as numerous chapters for edited volumes on the history of international and imperial thought. Jeanne is currently Co-President of the Association for Political Theory and is writing a book on the political thought of Edward Said.  

Aziz Rana's research and teaching center on American constitutional law and political development, with a particular focus on how shifting notions of race, citizenship, and empire have shaped legal and political identity since the founding. His book, The Two Faces of American Freedom (Harvard University Press, 2010) situates the American experience within the global history of colonialism, examining the intertwined relationship in American constitutional practice between internal accounts of freedom and external projects of power and expansion. His current book manuscript explores the modern rise of constitutional veneration in the twentieth century -- especially against the backdrop of growing American global authority -- and how veneration has influenced the boundaries of popular politics. He has written essays and op-eds for such venues as The New York Times, The Nation, Salon.com, CNN.com, Jacobin, and N+1. He has recently published articles and chapter contributions (or has them forthcoming) with Yale University Press, California Law Review, and Texas Law Review among others. 

 

 

This venue is physically accessible and has a gender-neutral restroom. Please contact the CSRPC at 773.702.8063 with any questions or accommodation requests.
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This series is organized by Professor Adom Getachew (Political Science) in partnership with the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture, with support from the Social Sciences Division, the Harris School for Public Policy, the Pozen Family Center for Human Rights, the Theory & Models Group, and the Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory (3CT) at the University of Chicago.



Apr 12 | Racing the International: “Globalizing Racial Capitalism”

Apr 12, 2017
4.30pm - 6pm
CSRPC, 5733 S University Ave

free and open to the public; rsvp

Recent economic histories have returned to question of transatlantic slavery’s constitutive role in the origins of capitalism and contributed to a renewed interest in the political economy of race. Focusing on the turn of the twentieth century and contemporary developments, this panel examines the intersections of racialization and financialization.

A panel discussion featuring: Kimberly Kay Hoang (University of Chicago), Peter Hudson (University of California-Los Angeles), and John Robinson (Washington University in St. Louis)

 

Kimberly Kay Hoang is an Assistant Professor of Sociology and the College at the University of Chicago. She received her Ph.D. in 2011 from the Department of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley and in 2012 she won the American Sociological Association Best Dissertation Award. Dr. Hoang is the author of, "Dealing in Desire: Asian Ascendancy, Western Decline, and the Hidden Currencies of Global Sex Work" (2015) published by the University of California Press. This monograph examines the mutual construction of masculinities, financial deal-making, and transnational political-economic identities. Her ethnography takes an in-depth and often personal look at both sex workers and their clients to show how high finance and benevolent giving are intertwined with intimacy in Vietnam's informal economy. "Dealing in Desire" is the winner of six distinguished book awards from the American Sociological Association, the National Women Studies Association, and the Society for the Study of Social Problems. With funding support from the Social Science Research Council and the Fulbright Global Scholar Award, she is currently conducting research for her second book project, "Capital Brokers in Emerging Markets." This second book involves a comparative study of the articulation of inter-Asian flows of capital and foreign investment in Southeast Asia.

Peter James Hudson is an historian who obtained his Ph.D. in American Studies from New York University and currently teaches in the departments of history and African American studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. His research interests are in the history of capitalism, racism, and U.S. imperialism; the intellectual and political-economic history of the Caribbean and the Black world; and the history of Black radicalism and global anti-imperialism. Hudson’s essays and reviews have appeared in "Black Agenda Report," "Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism," "Radical History Review, Race & Class: A Journal on Racism, Globalisation, and Empire," "Haitï Liberté, the CLR James Journal, the Los Angeles Review of Books," the "Boston Review of Books," "Transition: An International Review," and elsewhere. He is editor of "North: New African Canadian Writing" (a special issue of West Coast Line), and co-editor of a special issue of the "CLR James Journal: The Journal of the Caribbean Philosophical Association" on “Black Canadian Thought.” He also edits the digital history resource The Public Archive (thepublicarchive.com). Hudson is the author of "Banking on Empire: How Wall Street Colonized the Caribbean" (Chicago, 2017).

John N. Robinson III will join the faculty of the Department of Sociology at Washington University in St. Louis for the Fall 2016 semester as a Postdoctoral Fellow and he will assume the position of Assistant Professor in the Fall of 2017. Dr. Robinson completed his Ph.D. degree in the Department of Sociology at Northwestern University in the Spring of 2016. His current project—entitled Poverty, Place and Portfolio: Managing Neighborhood Inequalities in the Finance-driven Economy—brings together insights from urban and economic sociology to examine the politics of financial sector investment within anti-poverty policy, with a focus on housing programs for low-income families. His research on race, poverty, finance and the legal system has been supported by the Ford Foundation and the Horowitz Foundation for Social Policy.

 

This venue is physically accessible and has a gender-neutral restroom. Please contact the CSRPC at 773.702.8063 with any questions or accommodation requests.
______________________________________

This series is organized by Professor Adom Getachew (Political Science) in partnership with the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture, with support from the Social Sciences Division, the Harris School for Public Policy, the Franke Institute for the Humanities, the Pozen Family Center for Human Rights, the Department of Political Science, the Theory & Models Group, the Center for International Social Science Research, and the Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory (3CT) at the University of Chicago.



Mar 1 | Racing the International: “Tracing a Black Feminist International”

Mar 1, 2017
4.30pm - 6pm
CSRPC, 5733 S University Ave

free and open to the public

Despite the growing scholarship on black and subaltern internationalisms, there remains a stubborn gendering of internationalist politics. W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey and C.L.R. James are always identified with this tradition, while Claudia Jones, Pauli Murray, Merze Tate, Eslanda Robeson and others are often marginalized and forgotten. This panel takes up the question of internationalism from the perspective of Black women’s intellectual and political history as well as from a black and third world feminist theoretical lens.

A panel discussion featuring: Annette Joseph-Gabriel (University of Arizona), Erik S. McDuffie (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), and Barbara Ransby (University of Illinois-Chicago)

 

Annette Joseph-Gabriel is an Assistant Professor of French and faculty affiliate in Africana Studies at the University of Arizona. Her research focuses on francophone Caribbean and African literature, with interdisciplinary specializations in global feminisms, Afro-diasporic literary and cultural movements, and the Enlightenment in the French Atlantic. Her forthcoming book, Decolonial Citizenship: Black Women’s Narratives of Political Identity in the Francophone World, examines the political and literary writings of women involved in mid-twentieth century anticolonial movements in Francophone Central Africa and the Antilles. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Eighteenth-Century Studies, Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism, Slavery & Abolition: A Journal of Slave and Post-Slave Studies and The French Review. She is managing editor of Palimpsest: A Journal on Women, Gender and the Black International.

Erik S. McDuffie is an Associate Professor in the Department of African American Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). His research and teaching interests include African diaspora history, black feminism, black queer theory, black radicalism, black urban history, and black masculinity. He is the author of the book, Sojourning for Freedom: Black Women, American Communism, and the Making of Black Left Feminism (Durham: Duke University Press, 2011). The book received the 2012 Wesley-Logan Prize from the American Historical Association-Association for the Study of African American Life and History, as well as the 2011 Letitia Woods Brown Book Prize from the Association of Black Women Historians. He is also the author of several scholarly articles and essays published in Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society; Journal of African American History; African Identities; African and Black Diaspora: An International Journal; Radical History Review; American Communist History; Palimpsest: A Journal on Women, Gender, and the Black International; among other journals and edited volumes.

 
Barbara Ransby is an historian, writer and longtime activist. She is a Distinguished Professor of African American Studies, Gender and Women’s Studies, and History at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) where she directs  the campus-wide Social Justice Initiative. She previously served as Director of the Gender and Women’s Studies Program and Interim Vice Provost for Planning and Programs (2011-2012) at UIC.  Ransby is author of the highly acclaimed biography, Ella Baker and the Black Freedom Movement: A Radical Democratic Vision. The book received eight national awards and recognitions.
 
Ransby's most recent book is Eslanda: The Large and Unconventional Life of Mrs. Paul Robeson (Yale University Press, January 2013).  She serves on the editorial boards of The Black Commentator (an online journal); the London-based journal, Race and Class; the Justice, Power and Politics Series at University of North Carolina Press; and the Scholar’s Advisory Committee of Ms. magazine. In the summer of 2012 she became the second Editor-in-Chief of SOULS, a critical journal of Black Politics, Culture and Society published quarterly. 
 

 

This venue is physically accessible and has a gender-neutral restroom. Please contact the CSRPC at 773.702.8063 with any questions or accommodation requests.
______________________________________

This series is organized by Professor Adom Getachew (Political Science) in partnership with the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture, with support from the Social Sciences Division, the Harris School for Public Policy, the Franke Institute for the Humanities, the Pozen Family Center for Human Rights, the Department of Political Science, the Theory & Models Group, the Center for International Social Science Research, and the Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory (3CT) at the University of Chicago. 



Jan 18 | Racing the International: “From Bandung to Durban”

Jan 18, 2017
4.30pm - 6pm
CSRPC, 5733 S University Ave

free and open to the public

From the 1955 Afro-Asia meeting in Bandung to the 2001 World Conference against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance in Durban, transnational political actors has outlined a critique of the global color line and established racial equality as an international demand. This panel examines movements for racial justice and equality in the Americas, exploring how political actors makes use of international and transnational tools.

A panel discussion featuring: Prudence Browne (University of Illinois-Chicago), Justin Hansford (St. Louis University Law School), and Tianna Paschel (University of California-Berkeley)

 
Prudence Browne is the new Associate Director of the Social Justice Initiative and a Ph.D. Candidate in Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). She is the former Managing Editor of Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society and has over 15 years of experience working with community-based organizations and schools in New York City and Chicago. She is a core organizing member of Teachers for Social Justice in Chicago and a member of the Urban South Grassroots Research Collective. Her own scholarly research focuses on post-hurricane education reform in New Orleans, Louisiana.
 

Justin Hansford is an activist, lawyer, law professor, and is currently a democracy project fellow at Harvard University's Charles Warren Center. He has a B.A. from Howard University and a J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center, where he was a founder of The Georgetown Journal of Law and Modern Critical Race Perspectives. He joined the Saint Louis University law faculty after clerking for Judge Damon Keith on the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, and he has received a prestigious Fulbright Scholar award to study the legal career of Nelson Mandela in South Africa.

Living just 10 minutes from Ferguson, Hansford has been at the forefront of legal organizing and advocacy in the aftermath of the murder of Mike Brown. He co-authored the Ferguson to Geneva human rights shadow report and accompanied the Ferguson Protesters and Mike Brown's family to Geneva, Switzerland to testify at the United Nations. He has served as an advocate for proposed post-Ferguson reforms at the local, state, and federal, and international level, testifying before the Ferguson Commission, the Missouri Advisory Committee to the United States Civil Rights Commission, the President's Task Force on 21st Century Policing, and the Inter American Commission for Human Rights.

 
Tianna Paschel is an assistant professor of African American Studies at the University of California. She is interested in the intersection of racial ideology, politics, and globalization in Latin America. Her work can be found in the American Journal of Sociology, the Du Bois Review, SOULS: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture and Society, and Ethnic and Racial Studies, various edited volumes as well as in two forthcoming books. The first—Becoming Black Political Subjects– draws on ethnographic and archival methods to explore the shift in the 1990s from ideas of unmarked universal citizenship to multicultural citizenship regimes and the recognition of specific rights for black populations by Latin American states. The second is an interdisciplinary volume - Afro-Latinos in Movement co-edited with Petra Rivera-Rideau and Jennifer Jones – that explores transnationalism and blackness in the Americas. Tianna is also a Ford Fellow and member of the American Political Science Association Task Force on Race and Class Inequality as well as the Steering Committee of the Network of Anti-Racist Action and Research.
 

<< back to the "Racing the International" series

 

This venue is physically accessible and has a gender-neutral restroom. Please contact the CSRPC at 773.702.8063 with any questions or accommodation requests.
______________________________________

This series is organized by Professor Adom Getachew (Political Science) in partnership with the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture, with support from the Social Sciences Division, the Harris School for Public Policy, the Pozen Family Center for Human Rights, the Theory & Models Group, and the Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory (3CT) at the University of Chicago.



Nov 2 | Racing the International: “Racing International Law”

Nov 2, 2016
4.30pm - 6pm
CSRPC, 5733 S University Ave

free and open to the public

Critical histories of international law and international relations have recently explored the centrality of race as a category of classification and exclusion as these field developed in the late nineteenth century. This panel explores how race is conceived by and through international law.

A panel discussion featuring: James Gathii (Loyola University-Chicago), Renisa Mawani (University of British Columbia), and Teemu Ruskola (Emory University)

 

James T. Gathii is a professor of law and Loyola University Chicago’s Wing-Tat Lee Chair in International Law.  He was appointed to this prestigious chair in 2012 following a lengthy international search. Prior to joining Loyola, he was the associate dean for research and scholarship and the Governor George E. Pataki Professor of International Commercial Law at Albany Law School. His distinguished record of scholarship, teaching, and practice in the field of international human rights and trade have made a lasting impact on law and policy in Africa and around the world.  At Loyola, he teaches international trade law, facilitates international law student and faculty exchanges, as well as plans and develops international programs and conferences.     

Renisa Mawani is Associate Professor of Sociology and the co-chair of the Law and Society Program at the University of British Columbia. Her forthcoming book, Across Oceans of Law, to be published by Duke University Press, is a global and maritime legal history of the Komagata Maru. Dr. Mawani works in the fields of critical theory and colonial legal history and has published widely on law, colonialism, race, and legal geography. She is the author of Colonial Proximities (2009), the co-editor of The Travels of Law: Indian Ocean Itineraries published in Law and History Review (with Iza Hussin). In 2015, she received the Killam Prize for Graduate Instruction, a Dean of Arts Faculty Research Award, and was a Wall Scholar at the Peter Wall Institute, UBC. 

Teemu Ruskola is Professor of Law at Emory University, where he is also an affiliated faculty member in East Asian Studies, History, and Women’s Studies.  Prior to joining Emory, he taught at American University in Washington, D.C.  He is the author of Legal Orientalism: China, the United States, and Modern Law (Harvard University Press, 2013); co-editor of Schlesinger’s Comparative Law (Foundation Press, 2009); and co-editor (with David L. Eng and Shuang Shen) of a special double issue of the journal Social Text on “China and the Human.”  His other scholarship - appearing in American Quarterly, Journal of Chinese Philosophy, and Yale Law Journal, among others - has explored the intersection of corporate and family law in China, the history and politics of Euro-American conceptions of sovereignty in the Asia-Pacific, and China’s historic status as an international legal subject.  Ruskola is currently working on a book entitled China, For Example: China and the Making of Modern International Law, which analyzes the history of the introduction of Western international law into China, and the implications of that process for the theory and politics of international law.

event photos

 

<< back to the "Racing the International" series

 

This venue is physically accessible and has a gender-neutral restroom. Please contact the CSRPC at 773.702.8063 with any questions or accommodation requests.
______________________________________

This series is organized by Professor Adom Getachew (Political Science) in partnership with the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture, with support from the Social Sciences Division, the Harris School for Public Policy, the Pozen Family Center for Human Rights, the Theory & Models Group, and the Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory (3CT) at the University of Chicago.



ArtsPass Exclusive: “Hamilton” in Chicago | October 20, 2016

Oct 20, 2016
7.30pm - 11pm
The PrivateBank Theatre, 18 W Monroe St

$25 | Tickets only available to UChicago students, accompanying lectures are open to the public

This event is brought to you by the ArtsPass Program, Office of Multicultural Student Affairs, the Center for Leadership and Involvement and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture.   

The Tony award winning production of Hamilton is the story of America’s Founding Father Alexander Hamilton, an immigrant from the West Indies who became George Washington’s right-hand man during the Revolutionary War and was the new nation’s first Treasury Secretary. Featuring a score that blends hip-hop, jazz, blues, rap, R&B, and Broadway, Hamilton is the story of America then, told by America now.

IMPORTANT NOTE FOR UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO STUDENTS: Attend one of the following lectures to be entered to win the chance to purchase one $25 ticket to attend the Hamilton ArtsPass Exclusive trip on Thursday, October 20, with transportation included.  Only with valid UCID.  For more information on these lectures, visit artspass.uchicago.edu.

 

Public Lectures:
THU, OCT 13 / 4 PM / Law School / Tickets required, RSVP here.
With Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics, Martha Nussbaum, and Neubauer Family Assistant Professor of Law, William Baude.
Professor Nussbaum will be discussing distinction between envy and ambition, and the idea of dueling. Professor Baude will also pick up on themes of ambition, but talk about its place in the constitutional structure and separation of powers.

SUN, OCT 16 / 4 PM / Logan Center / Tickets required, RSVP here.
With Fairfax M. Cone Distinguished Service Professor, Ken Warren and Robert Newton Reid Professor of Law, Alison LaCroix.
Professor Warren will be discussing the status of the tragic as a mode in American dramatic and literary history, and its connections with politics.  Professor LaCroix will focus on the history, both as represented in “Hamilton” itself and in terms of the ways in which subsequent generations have understood the revolutionary and founding eras.

Reservations will be available starting WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5 at NOON.  
Only one ticket per University of Chicago student. Students can only attend one lecture.  

 

*All students who attend one of the ticketed lectures above will be eligible for a chance to purchase a $25 ticket to Hamilton. A lottery from those eligible for Hamilton Tickets will take place on Monday, October 17. Selected students will have one day to purchase their $25 ticket (includes transportation) to the Thursday, October 20 production of Hamilton. We have a limited number of subsidized tickets available for students who have demonstrated significant financial need. Please contact logancenter@uchicago.edu if you would like to explore this option.



OMSA Heritage Series: Jeff Chang | October 10, 2016

Oct 10, 2016
7pm - 9pm
University Church, 5655 S University Ave

free and open to the public

Join us for OMSA’s inaugural Heritage Series event of 2016-17!  Jeff Chang, author of We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation and Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in the Arts at Stanford University, leads a discussion on the role of artists and activists in social and cultural change.  The event will feature performances by a variety of poets and spoken word artists. 

 

Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music.

His first book, Can't Stop Won't Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation, garnered many honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He edited the book, Total Chaos: The Art and Aesthetics of Hip-Hop.

Who We Be: The Colorization of America (St. Martin's Press) was released on October 2014 to critical acclaim. It was published in paperback in January 2016 under the new title, Who We Be: A Cultural History of Race in Post-Civil Rights America (Picador).

His latest book, We Gon' Be Alright: Notes On Race and Resegregation (Picador), will be published in September 2016. His next project is a biography of Bruce Lee (Little, Brown).

Jeff has been a USA Ford Fellow in Literature and a winner of the North Star News Prize. He was named by The Utne Reader as one of "50 Visionaries Who Are Changing Your World,” by KQED as an Asian Pacific American Local Hero, and by the Yerba Buena Center for The Arts as one of its 2016 YBCA 100 list of those “shaping the future of American culture.” With H. Samy Alim, he was the 2014 winner of the St. Clair Drake Teaching Award at Stanford University.

Jeff co-founded CultureStr/ke and ColorLines. He has written for The Guardian, Slate, The Nation, the New York Times, theSan Francisco Chronicle, The Believer, Foreign Policy, N+1,Mother Jones, Salon, and Buzzfeed, among many others.

Born and raised in Honolulu, Hawai’i, he is a graduate of ‘Iolani School, the University of California at Berkeley, and the University of California at Los Angeles.

He serves as the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in the Arts at Stanford University.

For more, visit Jeff's Facebook page or his Twitter feed.

Visit organized by the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs, with support from the University Church, Arts + Public Life initiative and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture (CSRPC) at the University of Chicago, and the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools.
 
This event is wheelchair accessible. Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate should contact the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs for assistance at 773.702.5710.



Christiane Taubira, “Justice in Service of Equality” | October 10, 2016

Oct 10, 2016
6pm - 8pm
International House, 1414 E 59th St

 

free and open to the public

A lecture by, and conversation with, Christiane Taubira, former Minister of Justice of France. Post-lecture discussion will be moderated by Jennifer Wild (Cinema and Media Studies) and Mary Ann Case (Law School). 
 
 
Christiane Taubira is the founder of the left-wing Guianese party Walwari, and was elected four times to the National Assembly of France (representing French Guiana), where she was the driving force behind the 2001 law that recognizes the Atlantic slave trade and slavery as a crime against humanity. In June 2012, she was appointed Justice Minister of France.  In that capacity, she oversaw fundamental penal reforms that prevent recidivism and promote rehabilitation, and introduced a law that both legalized same-sex marriage in France, and allows same-sec couples to adopt children. 
 
Ms. Taubira is strongly committed to civil rights, women's rights, and the rights of disadvantaged youth.  In the wake of the terrorist attacks France suffered in 2015, she published a book, "Murmures à la Jeunesse", in which she argues that the French Republic has at its disposal all the tools and resources needed to combat terrorism successfully. 
 
Organized by the France Chicago Center, with support from the French Consulate, the Diplomatic Encounters Series, the Marianne Midwest Lecture Series, and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture (CSRPC), Center the Study of Gender and Sexuality, French Club, Global Engagement, Institute of Politics, and Global Voices Series at the University of Chicago. 
This event is wheelchair accessible. Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate should contact the Office of Programs & External Relations for assistance at 773.753.2274.



Alicia Garza: Black Lives Matter | September 28, 2016

Sep 28, 2016
6.15pm - 7.30pm
Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts, 915 E 60th St

 

free and open to the public

Alicia Garza, a co-founder of Black Lives Matter, will discuss the national movement’s past, present and future in a wide-ranging discussion about activism and organizing, supporting the voices of black cisgender, transgender and immigrant women, and the totality of black lives. 

Moderated by Eve Ewing, Assistant Professor at the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago. 

This event is wheelchair accessible. Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate should contact the Institute of Politics for assistance at 773.834.4671.



Free Radical Black and Brown Kids’ Library | June 24, 2016

Jun 24, 2016
3pm - 8pm
CSRPC, 5733 S University Ave

Join the event on Facebook!

We are so excited to introduce the Radical Kid Collective! The RKC is a collective of young people (and some guiding "adults") who are members of Organized Communities Against Deportation (OCAD) and Assata's Daughters. 

We have come together to practice solidarity and youth leadership to create our first event--a free Black and Brown kids' library! At this library, you'll be able to:

-Bring a book (about Black and brown people and/or written by them) and take a book
-Participate in youth led workshops 
-Hear bedtime stories
-Eat delicious foods
-And so much more!

We are collecting books in advance. Look out soon for book dropoff locations!

____________________________


Estamos emocionadxs de presentar el Colectivo Radical de Niñxs (RKC por sus siglas en Inglés)! El RKC es un colectivo de jóvenes (y adultos ayudando) quien son miembrxs de Comunidades Organizadas Contra las Deportaciones (OCAD por sus siglas en Inglés) y Assata's Daughters. 

Nos hemos juntado para practicar solidaridad y poner al frente liderazgo juvenil para crear nuestro primer evento como colectiva--una biblioteca gratuita de niñxs de comunidades de color! Tendrás la oportunidad de:

-Entrecambiar libros 
-Participar en talleres creados por los jóvenes participando en la colectiva 
-Escuchar cuentos 
-Comer una variedad de comida deliciosa
-Y muchísimo más! 

Estamos coleccionando libros por adelante entonces por favor estén atentos para cuando anunciemos las ubicaciones en las cuales tendremos cajas para donar libros!

This event is wheelchair accessible. Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact CSRPC for assistance at 773.702.8063 or csrpc@uchicago.edu.



African Religions in the Americas | May 20-21, 2016


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Swift Hall, 1025-35 E 58th St

In “The Forethought” to his 1904 “The Souls of Black Folk” WEB Dubois wrote, “I have sought here to sketch, in vague, uncertain outline the spiritual world in which ten thousand thousand Americans live and strive.” That world, Dubois argued, was inseparable from African Americans’ persistent desire to be both African and American. Dubois and many scholars who followed him variously sought to analyze and interrogate the notion of a linkage between Africa and the Americas and the importance of religion in that relationship. 

 

Twenty-first century scholarship on African religions in the Americas continues to grapple with many of the same issues, which this conference seeks to explicitly and critically address by turning its gaze to the field itself.  Thus, participants will use their own research to answer questions such as:

·      Does the field of “African religions in the Americas” actually exist?  If so, to what should it address itself?  By what methods, theories, themes, and concerns is it bound and how might those boundaries be in need of re-location?
 
·      What constitutes the “African” in African religions in the Americas? 
 
·      How does “Africa” figure as historical reality, religious symbol, and/or an actual or mythical homeland for African religions in the Americas? 
 
·      What is distinct about the religions of the African diaspora in the Americas?  Can they be studied in the same ways and to the same ends as other religions of the Americas?
 
·      How has the study of African American religions in the United States complicated the field? 
 
This conference will be conducted in a workshop-style format, with authors offering a brief (5 minute) introduction to their papers and the bulk of the time spent in discussion.  Attendance in the conference is predicated upon complete and critical engagement with all papers, which should be read in advance of the discussion.  For those interested in attending, please contact Emily Crews at emilydcrews at uchicago dot edu.

Participants

  • Michael Amoruso, University of Texas Austin
  • Vaughn Booker, Darthmouth College
  • Ras Michael Brown, Southern Illinois University
  • Emily Suzanne Clark, Gonzaga University
  • Emily D. Crews, University of Chicago Divinity School
  • Brent Crosson, University of Texas Austin
  • Edward Curtis, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis
  • Jacob Dorman, University of Kansas
  • Curtis J. Evans, University of Chicago Divinity School
  • Tracey Hucks, Davidson College
  • Stephan Palmie, University of Chicago
  • Alexander Rocklin, WIllamette College
  • Dianne Stewart, Emory University

For more information, and to register >>


Schedule of Events

Friday, May 20th
  • 3-3:30pm Introductory Remarks by Curtis J. Evans (Swift Common Room)
  • 3:45-5pm Session 1
  • 5-5:15pm Break
  • 5:30-6:45pm Session 2
  • 7pm Dinner and Drinks (for participants only)
 
Saturday, May 21st
  • 8:30-9am Continental Breakfast
  • 9-10:15am Session 3
  • 10:15-10:30am Break
  • 10:30-11:45am Session 4
  • 12-1pm Lunch
  • 1-2:15pm Session 5
  • 2:15-2:30pm Break
  • 2:30-3:45pm Session 6
  • 3:45-4pm Break
  • 4-5pm Closing Remarks and Discussion

 Sponsored by the Martin Marty Center and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture at The University of Chicago.



Michael Ralph on “Forensics of Capital” with Michael C. Dawson | May 17, 2016

May 17, 2016
6:00PM - 7:30PM
CSRPC, 5733 S University Ave

About the text: As one of Africa's few democracies, Senegal has long been thought of as a leader of moral, political, and economic development on the continent. We tend to assume that any such nation has achieved favorable international standing due to its own merits. In Forensics of Capital, Michael Ralph upends this kind of conventional thinking, showing how Senegal's diplomatic standing was strategically forged in the colonial and postcolonial eras at key periods of its history and is today entirely contingent on the consensus of wealthy and influential nations and international lending agencies.
 
Ralph examines Senegal's crucial and pragmatic decisions related to its development and how they garnered international favor, decisions such as its opposition to Soviet involvement in African liberationdespite itself being a socialist stateor its support for the US-led war on terrordespite its population being predominately Muslim. He shows how such actions have given Senegal an inflated political and economic position and status as a highly credit-worthy nation even as its domestic economy has faltered. Exploring these and many other aspects of Senegal's political economy and its interface with the international community, Ralph demonstrates that the international reputation of any nation, not just Senegal, is based on deep structural biases.
 
About Michael Ralph: Michael Ralph is Associate Professor in the Department of Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University. He is also Director of the Metropolitan Studies program. Ralph's research is concerned with citizenship and sovereignty, as well as economic and political transformation in the Atlantic world, especially Senegal, west Africa, and the US South. Ralph is the author of the University of Chicago Press book, Forensics of Capital. He has published in Disability Studies Quarterly, Souls, Social Text, Public Culture, South Atlantic Quarterly, the Journal of the History of Sport, and Transforming Anthropology. Michael serves on the editorial boards of Sport in Society and Disability Studies Quarterly. He is a member of the Social Text Editorial Collective and the Souls Editorial Working Group. Michael is Editor-in-Chief of Transforming Anthropology, the flagship journal of the Association of Black Anthropologists.
 
About Michael Dawson: Michael C. Dawson is the John D. MacArthur Professor of Political Science and the College, and the director of the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture at the University of Chicago. Dawson is one of the nation's leading experts on race and politics and a principal investigator on several important studies of black politics. From 2000-04 Dawson and Lawrence Bobo conducted six public opinion studies on the racial divide in the United States, creating the richest data on this issue that exists. His research interests have included the development of quantitative models of African American political behavior and public opinion, the political effects of urban poverty and African American political ideology. Most recently he is the author of Not in Our Lifetimes: The Future of Black Politics, which looks at political opinions among blacks in the last decade and contrasts them with white attitudes. His other books include Black Visions: The Roots of Contemporary African-American Political Ideologies and Behind the Mule: Race and Class in African-American Politics.
 
Presented in partnership with The Seminary Co-op Bookstores.
This event is wheelchair accessible. Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact CSRPC for assistance at 773.702.8063 or csrpc@uchicago.edu.



“Crook County” with Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve | May 11, 2016

May 11, 2016
4.30pm - 6pm
School of Social Service Administration Lobby, 969 East 60th Street

Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve, Ph.D., will lead a discussion about her new book, Crook County: Racism and Injustice in America's Largest Criminal Court (2016, Stanford University Press).

After ten years and over 1,000 hours of working in and observing the largest criminal courthouse in the country, Chicago-Cook County, Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve takes readers inside to our so-called halls of justice to witness the types of everyday racial abuses that fester within the courts, often in plain sight...Crook County's powerful, and at times devastating, stories reveal a legal culture steeped in racial stigma'a pernicious legal world where courtroom actors live and breathe racism while simultaneously committing themselves to a colorblind ideal. This book urges all citizens to take a closer look at the way we do justice in America and to hold our arbiters of justice accountable to a high standard of equality.

Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve is an Assistant Professor at Temple University in the Department of Criminal Justice with courtesy appointments in the Department of Sociology and the Beasley School of Law. She received her M.A. and Ph.D. in Sociology from Northwestern University where she was a legal studies fellow and received the Badesch Fellowship from the Chicago Appleseed Fund for Justice. She is the recipient of the 2014-2015 Ford Foundation Fellowship Postdoctoral Award and the 2015 New Scholar Award (co-winner) awarded by American Society of Criminology¹s Division on People of Color and Crime. She is also an affiliated scholar with the American Bar Foundation. Her book, Crook County: Racism and Injustice in America's Largest Criminal Court, and her legal commentary has been featured on NBC News, MSNBC's The Rachel Maddow Show and CNN. Her recent op-ed in the New York Times entitled, "Chicagos Racist Cops and Racist Courts" shows the complicity of the criminal courts in the racist culture of policing and injustice in Chicago.

This event is co-sponsored by the Seminary Coop Bookstore, CSRPC, and SSA as a part of our Illuminating (In)Justice Series.

For more information, and to register >>

If you are a person with a disability who will need any assistance, please contact us prior to the event at 773-702-9700.
 



Jimmy Santiago Baca: 12th Annual Cesar Chavez / Dolores Huerta Lecture | Apr 27, 2016

Apr 27, 2016
6pm - 8pm
Social Sciences 122, 1126 E 59th St

MEChA de UChicago presents: Jimmy Santiago Baca 

Author of the acclaimed book A Place to StandJimmy Santiago Baca will give this year's Latinx Heritage Series Keynote Lecture. Baca will discuss his previous literary work, his life experiences, and the Latinx identity. He will draw upon his knowledge to address the issues faced by Chicanx communities and the ways in which narrative has the power to transform and shape the future. 

Schedule of Events:
Lecture: 6-6.45
Q&A session: 6.45 - 7
Dinner reception 7-7.30

This is the second event in MEChA's 2016 Latinx Heritage Series titled “Arte Popular: Narratives of Change.” Arte popular is art created and consumed in mass by the people in opposition to higher academic culture. The speakers we have invited to this year’s series produce their work--from novels to documentaries to comic books--to give voice to largely untold stories in an effort to effect change in the world around them.

About A Place to Stand:  "Jimmy Santiago Baca's harrowing, brilliant memoir of his life before, during, and immediately after the years he spent in a maximum-security prison garnered tremendous critical acclaim and went on to win the prestigious 2001 International Prize. Long considered one of the best poets in America today, Baca was illiterate at the age of twenty-one and facing five to ten years behind bars for selling drugs. A Place to Stand is the remarkable tale of how he emerged after his years in the penitentiary -- much of it spent in isolation -- with the ability to read and a passion for writing poetry." - author Jim Farrow

El Movimento Estudiantil Chican@ de Aztlan (M.E.Ch.A) is part of a larger national movement and our specific M.E.Ch.A chapter is both an activist and culturally recognized student organization, that uses community service, political involvement and education as a means for change. M.E.Ch.A is not only open to Chicana/o or Latina/o students, but also to anyone who identifies with and commits themselves to promoting culture, history and higher education as devices for change.

Presented by MEChA de UChicago with support from the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture.



Haiti Beyond Commemorations and Boundaries: New Perspectives | May 12-14, 2016


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Franke Institute for the Humanities, 1100 East 57th St

The joint graduate and faculty conference Haiti: Beyond Commemorations and Boundaries will be held May 12-14, 2016 at The University of Chicago Franke Institute for the Humanities. An international group of scholars and doctoral candidates meet for the first time in a face-to-face gathering to assess the landscape of Haitian studies with an emphasis on the unique issues faced by graduate students and postdoctoral scholars who identify their field of interests in French Caribbean, Francophone, or French/Francophone literatures.

The conference explores the field of Haitian Studies through multiple approaches that go beyond geographical and linguistic boundaries as well as the chronological limitations of a century. The aim is to transcend the curiosity towards the Haitian Revolution, and the extended series of sociopolitical crises made more acute in the wake of the 2010 earthquake. Vast fields of potential inquiry in Haitian Studies (notably literature, history, anthropology, culture, and language) are too often under-examined, whereas the most popular of these fields seem bound by deeply entrenched traditional academic discourses. This event is an attempt to generate a pertinent, innovative, and theoretically informed approach to understanding Haiti. It proposes a brainstorming on current work in a number of disciplines, thereby attempting to move scholarly work and theoretical reflection on Haiti “beyond commemorations,” as the conference’s title so aptly puts it. The contributors represent a diverse group of scholars (both established and young researchers) in terms of discipline, methodological and theoretical perspectives. The conference will discuss the issues introduced above, with a special emphasis on all sorts of new ground-breaking projects related to the context of a New World intellectual history of Haiti and the Black American Diaspora since the French Revolution.

Papers cover (but are not limited to) the uncharted connection between late nineteenth-century Haitian thinkers (such as Anténor Firmin, Louis-Joseph Janvier) and Booker T. Washington, on the one hand, and W.E.B. Dubois and Jean Price-Mars (the Father of Negritude according to Senghor), on the other. A comparative analysis of the race issues and political visions of Black writers and historians in the context of a New World intellectual history of Haiti and the Black American Diaspora at the end of the nineteen century. Some following questions are: Is there an opportunity to understand the intellectual history of Haiti and the Black Atlantic? How and why does the French/Francophone tradition examine Haitian culture differently? How can we possibly talk about postcolonialities in the case of Haiti which has been independent since 1804? How does history of literature or philosophy of history engage with issues of slavery, colonialism, and the colonial legacy of racial conflict within Haiti? How to re-think Haitian music, culture, art, and tradition beyond colonialism and voodoo? What about Nietzsche and Haiti beyond Hegel and Haiti?

Conference organizers: 

Generously sponsored by: The University of Chicago Department of Romance Languages & Literatures, Franke Institute for the Humanities, The Humanities Visiting Committee at the University of Chicago, CIS Norman Wait Harris Fund, Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture, France Chicago Center, Center for Latin American Studies.

For a full conference schedule >>



Studying Race Relationally | May 12-13, 2016


May 12, 4pm - May 13, 5pm
International House Coulter Lounge, 1414 E 59th St


Scholars for several decades now have conceptualized race as a social construction shaped in specific historical, social and cultural contexts, and accordingly have written works on specific racialized groups, illuminating their place within America’s racial hierarchy.  But an emerging body of work has also begun to consider the relational nature of racializations moving beyond the analysis of how individual groups are formed in relation to whiteness to consider how they are formed in relation to each other. Relational studies of race posit that racialization happens dynamically; group-based racial constructions are formed not only in relation to whiteness, but also in relation to other devalued and marginalized groups (e.g. African Americans, Native Americans, Latinos, and Asian Pacific Islanders), whose own racialization is itself constantly in play. This conference on “Studying Race Relationally” seeks to explore these connections and dynamics.

Organized by Professors Ramón A. Gutiérrez (History, UChicago) and Natalia Molina (History, UC San Diego).  

This confererence is made possible with the support of the following sponsors: the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture; the Franke Institute for the Humanities; the Department of History; and the International House Global Voices Program at the University of Chicago. 

For a full conference schedule  >>



Marking Race, Making History: In honor of Thomas C. Holt | Apr 29-30, 2016


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Regenstein Library 122, 1100 East 57th Street

 

In honor of University of Chicago historian Thomas C. Holt, Marking Race, Making History is a two-day conference on the past, present, and future of African-American history. 

Thomas C. Holt, the James Westfall Thompson Distinguished Service Professor of American and African American History at the University of Chicago, is the preeminent historian of the peoples of the African diaspora in North America. His writing and teaching, covering the United States, the Caribbean, and beyond, has transformed the way scholars understand the histories of slavery, freedom, and race, as well as the legacy of the African-American experience. The significance of Holt’s scholarship reaches beyond the academy, illustrating the power of the historical imagination to make history in the present. 

Organized by Professors Jonathan Levy (History, UChicago) and Allyson Hobbs (History, Stanford)

For more information, and a full conference schedule >>



Reading and Discussion w/ Brazilian Poet Salgado Maranhão + Translator Alexis Levitin | May 3, 2016

May 3, 2016
5pm - 6.30pm
Classics 021, 1115 E 58th St


Join us for a conversation on poetry and Brazil, in which Salgado Maranhão and his translator will read passages from his most recently translated book, Tiger Fur (White Pine Press, 2015), and from the previous translation, Blood of the Sun (Milkweed Editions, 2012).

Salgado Maranhão is one of the best known poets of his generation in Brazil. Just this August, the Union of Brazilian Writers honored him with its poetry award for his retrospective collection A cor da palavra. In 2014, he won the Brazilian PEN Club prize for his book O mapa da tribo. In 2011 he won the poetry award from the Brazilian Academy of Letters for the above mentioned A cor da palavra, and in 1999 he won the prestigious Jabuti for Mural de ventos. At this stage he has won every major literary award available in Brazil. He has also collaborated extensively with well-known Brazilian musicians and composers and his work has appeared on a number of recordings.

Alexis Levitin has translated thirty-eight books, including Clarice Lispector’s Soulstorm and Eugenio de Andrade’s Forbidden Words (both from New Directions). Books published in 2015 include: 28 Portuguese Poets, translated with Richard Zenith, (Dedalus Press, Dublin, Ireland), Destruction in the Afternoon by Santiago Vizcaino (Dialogos Books, New Orleans), Exemplary Tales by Sophia de Mello Breyner Andresen (Tagus Press), and Salgado Maranhão’s Tiger Fur. He has been awarded three Fulbrights and two National Endowment for the Arts Translation Fellowships. He has held translation residencies at the Banff International Translation Center, The European Translators Collegium in Straelen, Germany (twice), and the Rockefeller Foundation Study Center at Bellagio.

Presented by the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture, and the Center for Latin American Studies.

For more information or if you need an accommodation in order to attend, please contact Victoria Saramago:
saramago@uchicago.edu

Caribbean Poetry Reading: Marcelo Morales and Aureamaría Sotomayor | April 29, 2016

Apr 29, 2016
12pm - 1.30pm
CSRPC, 5733 S University Ave

 

RSVP here

Marcelo Morales, Cuban Poet and Author: born in Cuba in 1977, is a member of a generation of writers who came of age in Havana during the island’s “Special Period” of severe post-Soviet economic crisis. Morales is the author of the poetry collections Cinema (1997, Pinos Nuevos prize) and Materia (winner of the 2008 Julián del Casal prize), and the novel La espiral (2006). Morales edited and introduced Como un huésped de la noche, an anthology of poetry by Roberto Branly, published in 2010. His work has appeared in Chicago-based MAKE Magazine and is forthcoming in MAKE X, a best of MAKE anthology.

Aurea María Sotomayor, Puerto Rican Poet/University of Pittsburgh:  Professor in the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures, and the Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies and Cultural Studies programs at the University of Pittsburgh. She is one of the most prolific poetic voices from the 70s Promotion in Puerto Rico. Her poetry collections include Sitios de la memoria (1983), La gula de la tinta (1994), Rizoma (1998), Diseño del ala (2005), Cuerpo nuestro (1987)and Artes poéticas (2014), among others. She was also co-founder of the cultural, literary, and post-modern theory oriented journals Postdata, Nómada and Hotel Abismo in Puerto Rico. She translated Derek Walcott’s The Bounty and has published two anthologies: De lengua razón y cuerpo (1987) on nine contemporary women poets and Red de voces (2011).

Light lunch will be served. Free and open to the public. 

Presented by the Center for Latin American Studies, with support from the Program in Poetry and Poetics and the CSRPC
 

For more information, contact Claudia Giribaldi:
cgiribaldi@uchicago.edu

Kathleen Neal Cleaver | Apr 21, 2016

Apr 21, 2016
6:30PM - 8:30PM
International House, Assembly Hall - 1414 E 59th Street, Chicago, IL 60637

On the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture's founding conference, and the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Black Panther Party, we are pleased present Kathleen Neal Cleaver for our 2016 Annual Public Lecture.  From 1967 until 1971, Cleaver was the Communications Secretary of the Black Panther Party, and the first woman member of their Central Committee.  Professor Cleaver currently lectures in legal history, civil rights history, and slavery and the anti-slavery movement at Emory University School of Law.  She will use this lecture to focus on the role of women in the Black Liberation Movement, then and now.  

event photos >>

Presented by the CSRPC with support from the International House Global Voices Performing Arts and Lecture Series, the Center for Identity + Inclusion, the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs, the Office of Civic Engagement’s UChicago Engages series, and the Black Panther Party - Illinois Chapter History Project.


ADDITIONAL PROGRAMMING
Sat, April 16, 2016 - 2pm
Screening + Panel Discussion: Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution
Logan Center Screening Room, 915 East 60th Street

Please join us for a screening of and panel discussion on Stanley Nelson’s The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution

The discussion will feature W.E. Dunbar, Black Panther Party (BPP) – Illinois Chapter; Joan Gray, BPP IL Chapter and Muntu Dance Theatre of Chicago; Valerie Papillion, Black Youth Project 100; and more. 

More information >>


Kathleen Neal Cleaver has spent most of her life participating in the human rights struggle. In 1966 she dropped out of Barnard College to work full time with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) where she served in the Campus Program. From 1967 to 1971 she was the Communications Secretary of the Black Panther Party, the first woman member of their Central Committee. After sharing years of exile with her former husband Eldridge Cleaver, she returned to the United States in late 1975. Devoting many years to challenging racist injustice, Cleaver has worked to free imprisoned freedom fighters, including Geronimo (Pratt) ji Jaga and Mumia Abu-Jamal.

Cleaver graduated summa cum laude with a B.A. in History from Yale College in 1984, and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. After receiving a J.D. from Yale Law School in 1989, Cleaver became an associate at the New York law firm of Cravath, Swaine and Moore. Kathleen Cleaver joined the faculty of Emory University Law School in 1992.

Cleaver has also taught at Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law in New York, in the African American Studies Department of Yale University, and at Sarah Lawrence College during 1999, where she was the Joanne Woodward Professor of Public Policy. She has won fellowships at the Bunting Institute of Radcliffe College, the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute of Harvard University, the Center for Historical Analysis at Rutgers University, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and the Center for Scholars and Writers of the New York Public Library to complete her book Memories of Love and War, a memoir which is still in progress. Her writing has appeared in numerous magazines and newspapers, including Ramparts, The Black Panther, the Village Voice, the Boston Globe, and Transition, and she has published scholarly essays in Critical Race Feminism, Critical White Studies, The Promise of Multiculturalism, and The Black Panther Party Reconsidered. Along with George Katsiaficas, humanities professor at Wentworth Institute of Technology, she co-edited the essay collection Liberation, Imagination, and the Black Panther Party (Routledge, 2001), and edited the collection of writings by Eldridge Cleaver published in the book, Target Zero: A Life in Writing, (Palgrave,2006).

During 2001, Cleaver returned to the Emory Law School as a Senior Lecturer and Research Fellow. She co-founded and produced the International Black Panther Film Festival based in Harlem from 1999 through 2003. Since 2000 Cleaver has served as co-director of the Human Rights Research Fund, part of a network of anti-racist organizations engaged in documenting violations of the human rights of U.S. citizens who challenge the racist and military policies within the United States. In addition to speaking widely across the U.S. at universities and public forums, she also participated in international study programs at the American University of Beirut, a United States law school consortium’s summer law study program  held in Rio de Janeiro, and the  International Book Festival held in Venezuela in 2007.  During 2009 Cleaver was a delegate to the 2nd Pan African Cultural Festival held in Algiers, Algeria during 2009, and during 2011 she was a participant in the International Film Festival held in Havana during 2011 when it screened the documentary film produced by Freedom Archives entitled COINTELPRO 101.

These events are wheelchair accessible. Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact CSRPC for assistance at 773.702.8063 or csrpc@uchicago.edu.



Unsuspending Disbelief | Jan 22 - Mar 13, 2016

Jan 22, 2016
Opening Reception: Fri, Jan 22, 6pm - 8pm
Logan Center Gallery, 915 E 60th St

Exhibition on View: Jan 22 - Mar 13, 2016

Thasnai Sethsaree, October: The Spectacular, 2015, fabric, paper, latex glue, glitter, urethane, paint. Photo by Clare Britt.

Unsuspending Disbelief questions the notion of a straightforward relationship between the photograph, what it depicts, and what it “means.” The exhibition’s repeated images of rainbows are an analog to the values we invest in photography. Light phenomenon without inherent meaning, photographs are understood as representing what they picture. Their social, historical, political, and aesthetic codes are seemingly neutral, as their ubiquity gives rise to a veracity that is understood as resolute. Foregrounding the conventions and rhetoric of photography, the artists included in Unsuspending Disbelief undermine photography’s legitimization of hegemonic forms of desire and its naturalization of the “real.” Drawing on traditional categories of picture making, from portraits of a beloved, to documentary and architectural photography, this exhibition considers strategies of recontextualization that displace the authority of the camera’s gaze. The exhibition features the work of ten contemporary international artists, including Shumon AhmedMatthew ConnorsGauri GillPaul GrahamAn-My LêYamini NayarThasnai SethasereeTejal ShahMickalene Thomas, and Lidwien van de Ven

Curated by Laura Letinsky, Professor in the Department of Visual Arts.

Presented by Logan Center Exhibitions with additional support provided by the Center of South Asian Studies (COSAS); Gray Center for Arts and Inquiry; Northwestern University; DoVA Open Practice Committee; The Arts Council, and The Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture.

 

PROGRAMMING
Unsuspending Disbelief: The Working Sessions
All sessions took place at the Gray Center Lab in Midway Studios.

Fri, Jan 15, 3:30pm
On the Ground: Renovating Social Institutions
with Thasnai Sethaseree, Faheem Majeed, Susan Meiselas, Dan Peterman and Hamza Walker followed by a reception

Mon, Jan 25, 3:30pm
The Form of Fear: Human Rights and Censorship in the Media
with Matthew Connors, Jonathan D. Katz, Genevieve Lakier, and Thasnai Sethaseree followed by a reception

Fri, Mar 4, 3:30pm
Bodies of Power and Desire for New Architecture 
with Sarah Luna, Yamini Nayar, DN Rodowick, and Yesomi Umolu followed by a reception

For more information >>

Image Credit: Thasnai Sethsaree, October: The Spectacular, 2015, fabric, paper, latex glue, glitter, urethane, paint. Photo by Clare Britt.



Narratives of Resistance: Stories and Performance of Joint Struggle | March 30, 2016

Mar 30, 2016
8pm - 10pm
Logan Center Performance Penthouse, 915 E 60th St

Join the Students for Justice in Palestine at UChicago, UofC Divest, and our allies in welcoming performers from a multitude of backgrounds and experiences for one night of radical art and truth-telling.

With the goal of bridging these already-existent connections between transnational struggles, from Chicago to Palestine, this event's performers will join our student body in the commencement of a crucial discussion and action on our role in the liberation of Palestinians and oppressed peoples everywhere.

 

Lubna Morrar is a Palestinian poet and artist, currently majoring in Sociology and minoring in Arab and Muslim Ethnities and Diasporas Initiative at San Francisco State University. The poet and her work were featured on the popular Arabic news networks, Aljazeera Arabic and English, Current TV, KPFA and Democracy Now! Morrar is more than an artist, having also been recognized as a significant constituent in the greater Palestinian movement, both locally and overseas. The Oakland-born-and-raised resident is also the co-president of General Union Of Palestine Students at SFSU, as well as an active member of the Palestinian Youth Movement (PYM). Morrar comes from a long line of political activism, especially as the women in and beyond her family life have instilled in her a strong political and anti-colonial consciousness for liberation and equity. 

Ethos is a poet and storyteller based in Chicago. He is also an organizer with Black Youth Project/BYP 100 and has worked with numerous SJPs in Chicago.
https://soundcloud.com/3thos-1
https://vimeo.com/147694948

Safi G is a Palestinian rapper based in Chicago and a member of B.A.N.D.I.T
https://soundcloud.com/bandoleros-3

"DreamWolf is the lyrically stout, Brooklyn-born, Hip Hop MC Jendog Lonewolf and the award-winning Performing Artist/Poet YaliniDream. Rooted in ending the full continuum of violence and exploitation, from the intimate to the global and from the home to the street to the state, DreamWolf invokes a commanding integration of Hip Hop, poetry, theater & dance in their collaborative work, AboveStreet Level. Brooklyn DreamWolf performed internationally in Africa, Asia, and North America, sharing stages with icons like Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Harry Belafonte, Joan Baez, and Rah Digga. They have performed at elite institutions such as Stanford, New York University, University of Michigan, and more. Additionally, they are teaching artists, working with elementary, middle, and high school youth in Brooklyn, NY. As artists that each sit at the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality, Brooklyn DreamWolf moves through different spaces, uniting and facilitating conversations across disparate communities and movements."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qhuymtWlgEY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WcCxWe17-dQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x3AAYIg9jPc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SiGn_t2wKYQ

"Remi is a poet and writer based in New York City. He is the author the forthcoming collection of poetry, Before the Next Bomb Drops: Rising Up From Brooklyn to Palestine. He is the author of Poetic Injustice: Writings on Resistance and Palestine and the editor of Poets For Palestine. His political commentary has been featured by news outlets throughout the world, including Salon, Al Jazeera English, and BBC Radio. His poetry has taken him across the US, Canada, Europe, and the Middle East, and he has appeared in the Palestine Festival of Literature as well as Poetry International. He is a Lannan Residency Fellow and an Advisory Committee member for the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel."
http://www.remikanazi.com/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uaGNfKabwfQ&feature=youtu.be&hd=1
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wvg4LknKsZ0


Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, & Culture, the UofC Divest Coalition, Jewish Voice for Peace UChicago, Jewish Voice for Peace Chicago, the Center for Identity + Inclusion, the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, LatinX Students Association at SSA, AlSharq, Queers United in Power, the Middle Eastern Studies Students Association, and the Student Government Funding Committee.



RIOTcon 2016: Mapping a Movement | Apr 15-16, 2016


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Chicago Theological Seminary, 1407 E 60th St

Register here.  

Chicago Theological Seminary (CTS) invites friends of the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture to register for RIOTcon for $75 using coupon code: CRPC16

 

Conference website

RIOTcon, the annual Spring conference hosted by Chicago Theological Seminary, is quickly becoming one of the leading events for social justice.

RIOTcon 2016: Mapping a Movement focuses on the history, organization and necessary tools for social justice movements. These two days feature a dynamic program and training schedule, including three keynote addresses, panel discussions and workshops led by the brightest minds of today.

CTS invites activists, students, scholars, religious leaders, artists, and concerned community members to engage in the Raging Issues Of Today (RIOT) conference. Join us for two dynamic days of keynote addresses, panel discussions, and breakout workshops.

Presented by Chicago Theological Seminary & Sponsored by Anonymous Donor



Jennicet Gutiérrez at UChicago | Apr 15, 2016

Apr 15, 2016
6:00PM - 8:00PM
School of Social Service Administration, 969 E 60th St

 

The LatinX Student Association (LSA) at the University of Chicago's School of Social Service Administration presents Jennicet Gutiérrez for LSA's Annual Speaker Series. 

Jennicet Gutiérrez is a transgender Latina activist and organizer from Mexico. She currently resides in Los Angeles. She is best known for shedding light on the plight of transgender women in immigration detention centers through her organization FAMILIA: TQLM (Trans Queer Liberation Movement). She burst onto the national scene when she interrupted President Obama during his White House speech in honor of Pride month, calling attention to the struggles of Trans immigrant women. Jennicet believes in the importance of uplifting and centering the voices of trans women of color in all racial justice work. Jennicet will continue to organize in order to end the deportation, incarceration and criminalization of immigrants and all people of color. 

This event is FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Registration is required

6pm - Dinner served
6:30 pm - 7:30 pm - Facilitated conversation with Jennicet 
7:30 pm - 8 pm - audience Q&A

Childcare and ASL/Spanish interpreters also available upon request prior to the event date. Please contact: latinaostudentassociation@gmail.com

Artwork by: Micah Bazant

This event is co-sponsored by the Elephant at SSA, Black Student Association at SSA, Justice Works at SSA, Organization for Latin American Students at UChicago, Immigration Law Society at UChicago Law School, Student Government Association at SSA, Graduate Council. 



An Evening with John Lee (aka John Threat aka Corrupt) | April 27, 2016

Apr 27, 2016
6:30PM - 8:00PM
CSRPC, 5733 S University Ave

The whole story starts in 1989, months before the Martin Luther King Day crash of AT&T. The whole mess, grew into a world-class electronic gang war fought by hackers from New York City to Texas.

An anonymous member of the Legion of Doom calls a member of the Masters of Deception a "nigger"- and in the loose-knit hacker underground, nothing is the same again.

–  Michelle Slatalla and Joshua Quittner, Wired Magazine 12.01.94

John Lee, a.k.a. John Threat, used the name “Corrupt” as a member of Masters of Deception (MOD), a New York based hacker group in the early ’90s.

As a result of his participation in the Great Hacker War, between MOD and rival hacker group Legion of Doom, he was indicted on federal wiretapping charges in 1992. He pled guilty and was sentenced to one year at a federal detention center. His participation in the Great Hacker War landed him on the cover of Wired Magazine in 1994.

Straight out of Brooklyn, John Lee (aka John Threat) is a writer/director, technologist and entrepreneur. He is repped by Mad Rux for directing.

John has recently finished duties as writer/producer on the show "Bugged Out" for MTV , a modern day take on Jackass using technology to prank people that will air Summer, 2016. A director of music videos for major labels and indie artist, he has also directed music video specials for Starz! and directed extensive visual work for the Miley Cyrus tour. In 2008, He was collaborated with Melvin Van Peebles on Confessions of an Ex-Doofus-Itchy-Footed Mutha as cinematographer.

John operates several entrepreneurial interests in technology and consumer products,  an AI powered music video generator for music artists called MVGEN, a powerfulopen-source intelligence (OSINT) engine that gathers global information and correlates it in Atlas 11,  and a coffee nootropics cold brew called Hacker's Brew, hitting grocery store shelves soon.

While John also happens to be internationally renowned computer hacker, he is also a security expert who has spent hours doing forensics and tracking down criminals in remote parts of the world.

He has been featured on the cover of magazines like Wired, and featured on CBS TV’s 60 minutes for his hacking acumen and derring-do.

Presented in Partnership with the Black Tech Mecca



Keeanga-Yahmatta Taylor with Cathy Cohen | April 6, 2016

Apr 6, 2016
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Chicago Cultural Center, 78 E Washington St

RSVP here

"Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor's searching examination of the social, political and economic dimensions of the prevailing racial order offers important context for understanding the necessity of the emerging movement for black liberation." 
—Michelle Alexander, author of The New Jim Crow

For most of US history, the police have used violence against African Americans with impunity—but after the murder of unarmed teenager Mike Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, mass protests erupted to challenge that impunity. In the process, a new generation of Black activists has come to question the old methods of struggle, puncture the Obama-era illusion of a “postracial” United States, and declare without apology that #BlackLivesMatter.

Activist and scholar Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor surveys the history and current realities of US racism. Taylor examines how institutional racism has created and shaped the structural problems that affect Black people, such as mass incarceration and unemployment, even as more Black people hold political office than ever before. She paints a vivid picture of the context for this new struggle against police violence—and shows the potential of the Black Lives Matter movement to reignite and broaden the struggle for liberation.

Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor writes on Black politics, social movements, and racial inequality in the United States. Her articles have been published in Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture and Society, Jacobin, New Politics, the Guardian, In These Times, Black Agenda Report, Ms., International Socialist Review, Al Jazeera America, and other publications. She is an assistant professor in the department of African American Studies at Princeton University.

Cathy J. Cohen is the David and Mary Winton Green Professor of Political Science and chair of the department. She has served as the Deputy Provost for Graduate Education and is the former Director of the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture at the University of Chicago. Cohen is the author of two books: "Democracy Remixed: Black Youth and the Future of American Politics" (Oxford University Press 2010) and "The Boundaries of Blackness: AIDS and the Breakdown of Black Politics" (University of Chicago Press 1999) and co-editor with Kathleen Jones and Joan Tronto of Women Transforming Politics: An Alternative Reader (NYU, 1997). Cohen is principal investigator of two major projects: The Black Youth Project and the Mobilization, Change and Political and Civic Engagement Project. Her general field of specialization is American politics, although her research interests include African-American politics, women and politics, lesbian and gay politics, and social movements.

Sponsored by Haymarket Books and Lannan Foundation

Cosponsored by:
• BYP 100
• Black Lives Matter Chicago
• Department of African American Studies Northwestern University
• Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture at UChicago
• Center for Black Diaspora, DePaul Unviersity
• Chicago Socialists - ISO
• UIC Social Justice Initiative


All tickets are general admission. Please arrive early - seating is first-come, first served.  

Books will be avaialble for sale and signing after the event.



Integrating the Inner City | Dec 3, 2015

Dec 3, 2015
5:30PM - 8:30PM
Newberry Library, 60 W Walton St

Please join us on Thursday, December 3, at 5:30PM at the Newberry Library in downtown Chicago for a conversation with Rob Chaskin (UChicago SSA,) Mark Joseph (Case Western University,) and the National Public Housing Museum in celebration of the publication of Chaskin and Joseph's new book, "Integrating the Inner City - The Promise and Perils of Mixed-Income Public Housing Transformation." The event is free and open to the public, and food and beverages will be served. However, reservations are required.

In the most thorough examination of mixed-income public housing redevelopment to date, Robert J. Chaskin and Mark L. Joseph draw on five years of field research, in-depth interviews, and volumes of data to demonstrate that while considerable progress has been made in transforming the complexes physically, the integrationist goals of the policy have not been met. They provide a highly textured investigation into what it takes to design, finance, build, and populate a mixed-income development, and they illuminate the many challenges and limitations of the policy as a solution to urban poverty.

The authors will be joined in conversation by the Youth Advisory Council of the National Public Housing Museum, a group of CHA residents ages 14 to 21 who represent communities across Chicago including Dearborn Homes, Trumbull Park Homes, Stateway Gardens, and Harold Ickes Homes. The conversation will be moderated by WBEZ's Natalie Moore.

The event is jointly sponsored by the Urban Network, the National Public Housing Museum, the School of Social Service Administration, the Seminary Co-op Bookstore, the Kreisman Initiative for Law and Housing Policy, and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture.



Dyett and Disinvestment | Dec 10, 2015

Dec 10, 2015
5:30PM - 7:00PM
The Silver Room, 1506 E 53rd St

 

In 2013, the City of Chicago chose to close nearly 50 public schools in mostly Black and Brown neighborhoods. In 2015, community members and activists went on a 34-day hunger strike to reopen Dyett High School as a green technology and global leadership school. Come to this IRRPP community conversation with Dyett hunger strike participants, South Side parents, activists, organizers and community members, and UIC education professors to discuss the Dyett hunger strike, educational disparities, and the struggle for public education in Chicago. 



City/Cité: A Transatlantic Exchange | Nov 4, 2015

Nov 4, 2015
8:30AM - 5:30PM
School of Social Service Administration, 969 E 60th St

In the context of a two-year transatlantic initiative, the University of Chicago will host a major gathering of scholars, policymakers, and local stakeholders/practitioners around some of the mostcritical issues facing French and American cities today. 

This is second of a two-day gathering, with the first days's activities being held at UIC

8:30AM — Welcome and Opening Remarks

8:45AM — Keynote Address
Mary Pattillo (Sociology, Northwestern University)
Speaking on “The Future of Black Metropolis”

10:00AM — Panel 4: Police-Community Relations in Transatlantic Perspective
Moderator: Robert Chaskin (Social Service Administration, University of Chicago)
Panelists: Forrest Stuart (Sociology, University of Chicago), Cathy Schneider (International Studies, American University, DC), François Bonnet (Researcher in Sociology, PACTE, CNRS), Shannon Bennett (KOCO), Craig Futterman (Law School, University of Chicago), Yazid Kherfi (Association Espoir 18)

12:00PM — Lunch

1:30PM — Panel 5: Arts & Culture: Art and Community Engagement/Youth Programs in the Arts 
Moderator: Betty Farrell (Cultural Policy Center, University of Chicago)
Panelists: Salah Amokrane (Association Tactikollectif), Céline Evita (Association Réponses Citoyennes), Lisa Yun Lee (Art History, University of Illinois at Chicago), Monica Haslip (Little Black Pearl), David Feiner (Albany Park Theater Project), Emily Lansana (University of Chicago)

3:30PM — Panel 6: Racial Discrimination and Anti-Discrimination in the United States and France
Moderator: Michael Dawson (Political Science, University of Chicago)
Panelists: Houda Asal (McGill University/Centre Maurice Halbwachs, Ecole Normale Supérieure), Frédéric Callens (Office for the Prevention of and Campaign against Discrimination, Commissariat General à l'Egalité des territoires, CGET), Cathy Cohen (Political Science, University of Chicago), Jasson Perez (National Co-Chair, Black Youth Project 100)
Julien Talpin (Political Science, CERAPS, Université Lille 2)

5:30PM — Closing Remarks

This event is organized by and made possible through the generosity of: Institut Français; Ministère de la Ville, de la Jeunesse et des Sports; The France Chicago Center; The Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture; The Urban Network; SSA; The Franke Institute for the Humanities; The Center for International Studies Norman Wait Harris Memorial Fund; the University of Illinois at Chicago; Agence nationale pour la cohésion sociale et l’égalité des chances (Acsé); Cultural Services of the French Embassy in New York & Chicago.



Western Cape Anti-Eviction Campaign: Discussion & Screening with Ashraf Cassiem | Mar 3, 2016

Mar 3, 2016
6:30PM - 8:30PM
CSRPC, 5733 S University Ave

For more than a decade the Western Cape Anti-Eviction Campaign has been one of the most prominent organizations of South Africa's militant poor, fighting against evictions and police brutality, as well as for free basic services and quality health care inthe country's working class townships and informal settlements. As a grassroots coordinating body for over 15 community organizations in the Western Cape Province, the WCAEC has been at the forefront of challenging the neoliberal economic policies that have been imposed since the fall of apartheid.

In addition to a discussion with Ashraf Cassiem, the Chairperson of the WCAEC, this event will also feature a showing of selections from Where the Mountain meets its Shadow, a 2010 documentary that sets the activism of the WCAEC against the backdrop of Cape Town's stark wealth inequality.  View trailer here.  

In 2009, the WCAEC's activism inspired the founding of Anti-Eviction Campaign affiliates in Chicago and in Los Angeles following Ashraf's speaking tour of the U.S. These local organizations have gained national attention for defending families facing eviction and taking over vacant, bank-owned homes as housing for homeless families.

This event is co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture, and the Pozen Family Center for Human Rights and funded by the Student Government Finance Committee.



Studying the Score: Race, Class, and Privilege in Classical Music | February 26, 2016

Feb 26, 2016
3:30PM - 5:00PM
Logan Center Performance Penthouse, 915 E 60th St

 
Studying the Score: Race, Class, and Privilege in Classical Music is an open panel and discussion event focused on issues of race, class, and privilege in classical music communities. Undergraduate and graduate students, professors, and musicians willcome together to discuss and unpack concepts of achievement, elitism, inequality, and racialization in the seemingly ‘meritocratic’ system of classical music. We will examine these issues at various structural levels, including ideology, institutions, and the day‐to‐day lives of amateur and professional musicians.
 
Panelists: Lucinda Ali-Landing, Rashida Black, Lauren Eldridge, Travis Jackson, Meredith Aska McBride, Steve Rings, and Braxton Shelley

Moderated by: Lindsay Wright

Sponsored by UChicago Chamber Music Organization, the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture at the University of Chicago, and the UChicago Student Government Financial Committee.



gender | publics | panics in the global South | May 5-6, 2016


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Wilder House, 5811 S Kenwood Ave

Conference website

In the past two decades, changing economies and new, international forms of governance, not least the “women’s human rights” industry, have transformed social landscapes across the global South. In many parts of the world, these changes have provided women with economic opportunities and made images and iconography of women – and women themselves – increasingly visible in public spheres, political arenas, and professional domains. Paradoxically, however, women’s economic success and political recognition, as well as the circulation of women’s human rights discourses intended to foster equality have been accompanied by “moral panics” – both global and local – over the visibility, mobility, and sexuality of women and girls. For example in South Africa where marriage rates have reached new lows, single mothers have become a highly visible social category, eligible for state relief through a newly-instated Child Support Grant.  Their access to these new state privileges has been accompanied by increased surveillance; South African men and elders accuse young mothers of abusing their rights, upending the moral order. Both Uganda and Kenya, where national constitutions guarantee gender quotas for elected politicians, have also recently passed national legislation that seeks to regulate women’s clothing (i.e. the so-called “Miniskirt Bill” passed in Uganda in 2014). According to media reports, this legislation was initially enforced by groups of vigilantes. Meanwhile in Guatemala, as a number of organizations to protect and promote the rights of women have emerged in the aftermath of the war, making it seem as if indigenous women are now more institutionally empowered than ever, rates of domestic violence have increased throughout the country. And in India, where women have been particularly quick to take advantage of the new openings in the liberalizing economy, they have also been targets of gendered violence such as rape and sexual assault, often justified in starkly moralizing and patriarchal terms.

These observations suggest some broadly similar patterns across a range of contexts. Apparently similar phenomena, however, may reveal different social, cultural, and political processes. Given these observations, we invite papers exploring new formations of, or contests over, gendered and generational power emerging in the global South. In what ways do conflicts over women’s visibility and mobility correspond to the reconfiguration of (in)equalities between men and women? What role does the circulation of women’s human rights discourses play in this process? How do these conflicts relate to ongoing changes in kin relations, regimes of love, and new forms of state regulation? And how does attending to new social panics reveal the shifting lines of contemporary citizenship and the way in which gender figures in these arrangements?  Posting these questions, we seek to examine the ways women and men, in their everyday lives, negotiate both new forms of access to public spheres – be they economic, political, professional, or the arts – and the moral panics that access incites.

This conference is being organized by Erin Moore, Sneha Annavarapu, and Camille Roussel, with support from the Center from the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture and many other sponsors. 

 



Kettly Mars on “Savage Season” with William L. Balan-Gaubert | April 10, 2016

Apr 10, 2016
4pm - 5pm
Seminary Co-op Bookstore, 5751 S Woodlawn Ave

Join the event on Facebook!

 

Kettly Mars discusses Savage Seasons.

About the book: Port-au-Prince, the 1960s: Duvalier and his militia are systematically eliminating opponents to the regime. Daniel Leroy, editor in chief of the opposition newspaper, has just been arrested. To find out what has become of him, his wife, Nirvah, visits Raoul Vincent, secretary of state at the Office of Public Safety. This fearsome head of the secret police is instantly smitten, and to ensure her husband’s survival and protect her family, Nirvah submits to the official’s desires. Becoming the mistress of a strongman in the regime is not without its benefits. Still, she has to endure her neighbors’ inquisitive looks and the silent questions of her own children.

Kettly Mars’s Savage Seasons describes a pivotal and painful period in Haitian history by weaving together two stories: the personal story of Nirvah and her family and the universal story of Duvalier’s dictatorial regime and its abuses.

About the author: Kettly Mars was born in 1958 in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, where she resides today. She is the author of three novels and two story collections.

About the interlocutor: William L. Balan-Gaubert is a native of Haiti and a Haitian History Scholar in residence at the University of Chicago. He has studied in Haiti, France and the United States and has lectured widely on various aspects of Haitian history, society and culture. He is at present researching the Duvalier dynasty (1957-1989). He teaches Haitian Kreyòl  in the Department of Romance Languages and Literature and the Center for Latin American Studies.

Co-sponsored by the Seminary Co-op Bookstores, Cultural Services of the French Embassy, Creative Writing, Center for Latin American Studies, and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture.

This event is wheelchair accessible. Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate should contact the Seminary Co-op for assistance at 773.752.4381.



Natalie Moore on “THE SOUTH SIDE” with Rick Perlstein | March 31, 2016

Mar 31, 2016
6pm - 8pm
International House, 1414 E 59th St

Natalie Moore discusses THE SOUTH SIDE: A Portrait of Chicago and American Segregation. Moore will be joined by Rick Perlstein. 

About the book: In THE SOUTH SIDE: A Portrait of Chicago and American Segregation (St. Martin’s Press; On-sale: March 22, 2016; ISBN: 9781137280152; $27.99), born and bred Chicagoan and WBEZ reporter Natalie Moore provides a contemporary snapshot of a fundamental issue facing her native city today: segregation on the South Side.


While mayors Richard M. Daley and Rahm Emanuel have touted Chicago as a “world-class city,” it remains one of the most segregated cities in America. And while it would be easy to think of a city with a billion-dollar park, Michelin-rated restaurants, waterfront views, world-class shopping, and a thriving theater scene as a model for other metropolitan areas, underneath the shiny façade lurks the horrible reality of deeply-rooted and destructive racial segregation.

Throughout THE SOUTH SIDE, Moore shows that race—not class—determines the policies that perpetuate the city’s injustices. Shining a bright light on Chicago’s housing policies, its segregated schools (and lack of political will to integrate Chicago Public Schools), institutionalized practices that leave predominantly black neighborhoods vulnerable to crime and bad banking policies, Moore takes readers inside a system that keeps a segment of the city’s population from having a chance at the American Dream.

In THE SOUTH SIDE, Moore uses her skills as a conscientious reporter to showcase the lives of these those living in these underserved communities. Through intimate stories and investigative research, THE SOUTH SIDE highlights the impact of Chicago’s historic segregation – and the ongoing policies that keep the system intact.

Just in time for the 100th anniversary of the Great Migration, THE SOUTH SIDE shows that until segregation is eradicated, there will always be racial inequity. I look forward to discussing this book with you in the weeks to come.

About the author: Natalie Moore is the South Side bureau reporter for WBEZ, Chicago’s NPR–member station. Before joining WBEZ, she covered Detroit’s City Council for Detroit News. She worked as an education reporter for the St. Paul Pioneer Press and as a reporter for the Associated Press in Jerusalem. Her work has been published in Essence, Black Enterprise, the Chicago Reporter, In These Times, the Chicago Sun-Times and the Chicago Tribune. She lives in Chicago.

About the interlocutor: Rick Perlstein is the author of three books: Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan, Nixonland: The Rise of a President and the Fracturing of America, and Before the Storm: Barry Goldwater and the Unmaking of the American Consensus.

Collaboration of the Seminary Co-op Bookstore, the Urban Network, the Institute of Politics, and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture.

This event is wheelchair accessible. Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate should contact the Seminary Co-op for assistance at 773.753.2270.



Margo Jefferson on “Negroland: A Memoir” with Jamie Kalven | January 14, 2016

Jan 14, 2016
6pm - 7:30pm
Seminary Co-op Bookstore, 5751 S Woodlawn Ave

 
About the book: At once incendiary and icy, mischievous and provocative, celebratory and elegiac-here is a deeply felt meditation on race, sex, and American culture through the prism of the author's rarefied upbringing and education among a black elite concerned with distancing itself from whites and the black generality while tirelessly measuring itself against both. Born in upper-crust black Chicago-her father was for years head of pediatrics at Provident, at the time the nation's oldest black hospital; her mother was a socialite-Margo Jefferson has spent most of her life among (call them what you will) the colored aristocracy, the colored elite, the blue-vein society. Since the nineteenth century they have stood apart, these inhabitants of Negroland, "a small region of Negro America where residents were sheltered by a certain amount of privilege and plenty."
 
Reckoning with the strictures and demands of Negroland at crucial historical moments-the civil rights movement, the dawn of feminism, the fallacy of postracial America-Jefferson brilliantly charts the twists and turns of a life informed by psychological and moral contradictions. Aware as it is of heart-wrenching despair and depression, this book is a triumphant paean to the grace of perseverance.
 
About the author: The winner of a Pulitzer Prize for criticism, Margo Jefferson was for years a theater and book critic for Newsweek and The New York Times. Her writing has appeared in, among other publications, Vogue, New York magazine, and The New Republic. She is the author of On Michael Jackson and is a professor of writing at Columbia University School of the Arts.

About the interlocutor: Jamie Kalven is a writer and executive director of the Invisible Institute. He is the author of "Working With Available Light: A Family’s World After Violence" and the editor of "A Worthy Tradition: Free Speech in America" by his father Harry Kalven, Jr. He has reported extensively on police abuse in Chicago and was the plaintiff in Kalven v. Chicago, in which the Illinois appellate court ruled that documents bearing on allegations of police misconduct are public information. He was in school behind Jefferson at The University of Chicago Laboratory School: the Lab School.
 
This event is wheelchair accessible. Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate should contact the Seminary Co-op for assistance at 773.752.4381.
 
 
 



Lester K. Spence on “Knocking the Hustle” with Michael C. Dawson | February 24, 2016

Feb 24, 2016
6pm - 7:30pm
Seminary Co-op Bookstore, 5751 S Woodlawn Ave

 
About the book: Over the past several years scholars, activists, and analysts have begun to examine the growing divide between the wealthy and the rest of us, suggesting that the divide can be traced to the neoliberal turn. "I'm not a business man; I'm a business, man." Perhaps no better statement gets at the heart of this turn. Increasingly we're being forced to think of ourselves in entrepreneurial terms, forced to take more and more responsibility for developing our "human capital." Furthermore a range of institutions from churches to schools to entire cities have been remade, restructured to in order to perform like businesses. Finally, even political concepts like freedom, and democracy have been significantly altered. As a result we face higher levels of inequality than any other time over the last century.

In Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics, Lester K. Spence writes the first book length effort to chart the effects of this transformation on African American communities, in an attempt to revitalize the black political imagination. Rather than asking black men and women to "hustle harder" Spence criticizes the act of hustling itself as a tactic used to demobilize and disempower the communities most in need of empowerment.

Lester K. Spence is an associate professor of political science and Africana studies at Johns Hopkins University. He specializes in the study of black, racial, and urban politics in the wake of the neoliberal turn. An award winning scholar (in 2013, he received the W.E.B. DuBois Distinguished Book Award for his book, Stare in the Darkness: The Limits of Hip-hop and Black Politics) and teacher (in 2009, he received an Excellence in Teaching Award), he can regularly be heard on National Public Radio and the Marc Steiner Show.
 
Michael C. Dawson is the John D. MacArthur Distinguished Service Professor of Political Science and the College at the University of Chicago. His research interests have included the development of quantitative models of African American political behavior, identity, and public opinion, the political effects of urban poverty, and African-American political ideology. This work also includes delineating the differences in African American public opinion from those of other racial and ethnic groups. More recently he has combined his quantitative work with work in political theory.


Collaboration of the Seminary Co-op Bookstore and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture.

This event is wheelchair accessible. Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate should contact the Seminary Co-op for assistance at 773.752.4381.



“Dressing for the Revolution” with Tanisha C. Ford | February 11, 2016

Feb 11, 2016
6pm - 7:30pm
CSRPC, 5733 South University Avenue

 

Professor Ford will deliver a lecture focused on her latest work, Liberated Threads: Black Women, Style, and the Global Politics of Soul.


About the book: From the civil rights and Black Power era of the 1960s through antiapartheid activism in the 1980s and beyond, black women have used their clothing, hair, and style not simply as a fashion statement but as a powerful tool of resistance. Whether using stiletto heels as weapons to protect against police attacks or incorporating African-themed designs into everyday wear, these fashion-forward women celebrated their identities and pushed for equality.
 
In this thought-provoking book, Tanisha C. Ford explores how and why black women in places as far-flung as New York City, Atlanta, London, and Johannesburg incorporated style and beauty culture into their activism. Focusing on the emergence of the "soul style" movement-represented in clothing, jewelry, hairstyles, and more-Liberated Threads shows that black women's fashion choices became galvanizing symbols of gender and political liberation. Drawing from an eclectic archive, Ford offers a new way of studying how black style and Soul Power moved beyond national boundaries, sparking a global fashion phenomenon. Following celebrities, models, college students, and everyday women as they moved through fashion boutiques, beauty salons, and record stores, Ford narrates the fascinating intertwining histories of Black Freedom and fashion.
 
Tanisha C. Ford is an assistant professor of Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. She is the author ofLiberated Threads: Black Women, Style, and the Global Politics of Soul (UNC Press, 2015). Ford has current and forthcoming publication in the Journal of Southern History, NKA: Journal of Contemporary African Art, and The Black Scholar. Her research has been supported by institutions including the Ford Foundation, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and the Center for Black Music Research.  Her public writing and cultural commentary have been featured in diverse media outlets and publications including The Root, the New Yorker, NPR: Code Switch, Fuse, News One, The Feminist Wire, and Feministing.
 
 
This event is wheelchair accessible. Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact CSRPC for assistance at 773.702.8063 or csrpc@uchicago.edu.

 



UChicago Teach-in on Racism and Activism | February 12, 2016

Feb 12, 2016
10:00AM - 5:00PM
Saieh Hall, 1160 E 58th St


Photo © Jamie Manley/The Chicago Maroon, 2013

The Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture, with support from the Center for Identity + Inclusion, invites you to participate in a teach-in on racism and activism on Friday, February 12th.  This teach-in will address the racial climate and incidents of violence at the University of Chicago, within the city, and throughout the country.  The organizers of this event represent faculty, staff, undergraduates, and graduate students who seek to  engage in rigorous conversation that includes the concerns of underrepresented minorities on campus as well as those of our neighbors. Moreover, we hope to provide a space in which students, faculty, staff, and community members can come together to discuss how to jointly strive for racial and social justice.

The day will be organized around the following topics and themes: racial tensions, anti-blackness and institutional racism on campus; the role of the University in fighting and/or reproducing racial inequality on the Southside and more generally within the city of Chicago; and activism yesterday, today and tomorrow--a panel dedicated to learning from the current generation of activists fighting racial and other forms of injustice and from previous generations of activists. In each session, we will consider how these issues impact our intellectual pursuits inside and outside the classroom.

Our event runs through the day on Friday, February 12th, the University’s College Break Day.  Organizers have decided to hold the event on this day in an effort to maximize participation and not conflict with the academic priorities of the University.  We recognize that this is a critical moment not only on college campuses but in the nation as we have witnessed horrific acts of racial violence, and are entering a Presidential campaign that already has produced the most toxic rhetoric in a generation. We see this day as the first of a series of activities to address these issues and hope you will be able to participate.

#csrpcteachin

VIew recordings from the session and the scheduled program here.

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Recommended readings in advance of the teach-in can be found by clicking here.  By topic: 

This event is wheelchair accessible. Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact CSRPC for assistance at 773.702.8063 or csrpc@uchicago.edu.



Dr. Cornel West | Feb 1, 2015

Feb 1, 2015
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Rockefeller Memorial Chapel - 5850 S. Woodlawn, Chicago, IL 60637

The Center for the Study of Race Politics and Culture proudly presents its Annual Public Lecture with Dr. Cornel West, on his book The Radical King.  

"Every year, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., is celebrated as one of the greatest orators in US history, an ambassador for nonviolence who became perhaps the most recognizable leader of the civil rights movement. But after more than forty years, few people appreciate how truly radical he was.

Arranged thematically in four parts, The Radical King includes twenty-three selections, curated and introduced by Dr. Cornel West, that illustrate King’s revolutionary vision, underscoring his identification with the poor, his unapologetic opposition to the Vietnam War, and his crusade against global imperialism. As West writes, 'Although much of America did not know the radical King—and too few know today—the FBI and US government did. They called him ‘the most dangerous man in America.’ . . . This book unearths a radical King that we can no longer sanitize.'"
-Beacon Press

event photos >>

Co-sponsored by the Office of Civic Engagement's UChicago Engages series, Seminary Co-op Bookstores, and Beacon Press.



“Hate Crimes in the Heartland” screening and discussion | October 15, 2015

Oct 15, 2015
4pm - 6:30pm
CSRPC, 5733 South University Avenue

Hate Crimes in the Heartland is a feature documentary by Emmy Award winner Rachel Lyon. The film explores the national conversation on race through the lens of two distinct hate crimes that took place over 90 years apart - in Tulsa, Oklahoma. By chronicling this arc of history and exploring the collateral damage of hate crimes Heartland provides a context to America’s contentious relationship with its most provocative issues – race, media, crime and justice.  A panel discussion featuring Lyon will immediately following the screening.

Free and open to the public. 

Presented by the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture in partnership with the Reproduction of Race and Racial Ideologies Workshop, the Pozen Family Center for Human Rights, Amnesty International USA, and the Ford Foundation’s JustFilms program. 

This event is wheelchair accessible. Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact CSRPC for assistance at 773.702.8063 or csrpc@uchicago.edu.



Issa Rae | November 2015

Nov 9, 2015
7PM - 9.30PM
Mandel Hall, 1131 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL

Get up close and awkward with producer, writer, and director Issa Rae. Rae will be in conversation with Jacqueline Stewart, UChicago Professor of Cinema and Media Studies.  Following the discussion, Rae will sign copies of her first book, The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl.  View the full conversation below!

event photos >>

Presented by the Center for the Study of Race, Politics & Culture in partnership with the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs' Heritage Series, Arts + Public Life, the Committee on Creative Writing, UChicago Careers in Journalism, Arts, and Media, Black Cinema House and the Seminary Co-Op Bookstores.

 

Oct 29, 2015 | Making Mirrors: A Look at the Work of Issa Rae
7PM 
Black Cinema House, 7200 South Kimbark Avenue, Chicago, IL

A night of clips and conversation about comedy writer, actor and director Issa Rae's award-winning works The Misadventures of an Awkward Black Girl, Fly Guys, The Choir, and Ratchetpiece Theatre. As a precursor to Rae's appearance at the University of Chicago on November 9, join us for a lively round-table discussion on how the use of comedy in Rae's work addresses issues of representation, hyper-visibility and invisibility of black bodies in television and film. All attendees are required to laugh and speak their mind.

Program curated by Carris Adams (UChicago, MFA '15), with student panelists Jenn M. Jackson (Doctoral Student, Political Science, UChicago), Devin Mays (MFA Student, Visual Arts, UChicago) and Jared Richardson (Doctoral Candidate, African American Studies, Northwestern).



Town Hall for the Campaign to Create a Smithsonian American Latino Museum | May 20, 2015

May 20, 2015
4:30PM - 8:00PM
Gleacher Center, 450 N. Cityfront Plaza Dr., Chicago, IL 60611

American Latino Museum Town Hall Invite

 

Friends of the American Latino Museum (FRIENDS) is the only campaign dedicated to the creation of a National Smithsonian American Latino Museum. As an effort to mobilize students, local Latino leaders, and academic communities across the country, FRIENDS launched University town halls at Rice University and at the University of Southern California in 2013. In partnership with leading research institutions, the informational town halls served as a venue for sharing Latino history and generating the momentum in key cities that will be needed for achieving our goal and fostered an interactive conversation focused on nurturing the urgency for this museum.

On May 20th, FRIENDS will travel to Chicago to host the third town hall with the University of Chicago’s Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture (CSRPC), gathering local Chicago historians, academics, students and Latino leaders including Cook County Commissioner Chuy Garcia, Dr. Rosa Cabrera, Dr. Ramon Gutierrez, Carlos Hernandez, Billy Ocasio, Bibiana Suarez, Dr. Nena Torres, and Angel Ysaguirre, in a discussion of the need and future steps for a National Smithsonian American Latino Museum to showcase the contributions and stories of Latinos, with the context of Chicago’s rich Latino history.
 

For more information, visit: http://americanlatinomuseum.org/chicago_town_hall/



National Forum on Police Crimes | May 16 & 17, 2014

May 16, 2014
9:00am - 5:00pm
International House, Assembly Hall, 1414 E. 59th Street, Chicago, IL

Call for a National Forum on Police Crimes in defense of democracy and to end racist and political repression. Please visit the Forum website to register and for additional information.

There are a limited number of free registration passes for UChicago students interested in attending the forum. Interested students should send an email to contact@naarpr.org indicating that you want to register and are a UChicago student. Includesyour name, address, phone, and email address (very important).



Freedom Summer After 50 Years: Looking Back & Looking Forward | May 12-13, 2014

May 12, 2014
4:30pm - 6:00pm
SSA Room E-1, 969 E. 60th Street

Click here to visit the Facebook event page and here for background readings on Freedom Summer!

Please Note that the May 13th talk at 5733 S. University Ave. will now start at 4pm and end at about 5:30pm.



“Freedom Song” - Special Film Screening | April 21, 2014

Apr 21, 2014
7pm - 10pm
Reynolds Club, Hallowed Grounds Coffee Shop | 5706 South University, Chicago, IL 60637

 

The Institute of Politics (IOP), Center for the Study of Race, Politics & Culture (CSRPC) and the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs (OMSA) present the screening of this award winning film, starring Danny Glover, as part of a series of events commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the 1964 Freedom Summer Project; a massive campaign that took Northern college students to Mississippi to register African American voters who were being denied the right to vote through local customs, laws, and violence.

Freedom Song is based on true stories of Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) organizing efforts in Mississippi in the 1960s.

The film will be introduced by SSA Professor Charles Payne, author of I've Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle

To learn more about  Freedom Song and Freedom Summer click here

Free & Open to the Public. Space is limited. Light refreshments will be served.

 

 

 

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Danny Glover delivers the CSRPC Annual Public Lecture at Rockefeller Memorial Chapel at 4:00pm - Sunday, May 4, 2014. To learn more click here



Danny Glover | May 4, 2014

May 4, 2014
4:00pm - 6:00pm
Rockefeller Memorial Chapel - 5850 S. Woodlawn, Chicago, IL 60637

 

The Center for the Study of Race Politics and Culture proudly presents its Annual Public Lecture with Danny Glover, internationally acclaimed actor, director, producer and activist in discussion with Jacqueline Stewart, Professor of Cinema & Media Studies, University of Chicago.

This event commemorates the 50th Anniversary of the 1964 Freedom Summer Project; a massive campaign that took Northern college students to Mississippi to register African American voters who were being denied the right to vote through local customs, laws, and violence.

event photos >>

watch here

Co-sponsored by The Institute of Politics, Office of Civic Engagement's UChicago Engages series, Office of Multicultural Student Affairs, Organization of Black Students & the Rockefeller Memorial Chapel at the University of Chicago.

 

 

 

 



America’s Most Wanted: Hip-Hop, Media & the Prison Industrial Complex | April 12, 2014

Apr 12, 2014
2:00pm - 4:00pm
International House, Assembly Hall

America's Most Wanted: Hip-hop, the Media & the Prison Industrial Complex examines the prison crisis by placing two of America's most influential industries in the crosshairs: corporate-owned media and entertainment. From exploring trends in national news coverage to debating narratives that dominate hip-hop music and popular culture, a provocative panel of scholars, activists and artists will consider the ways these industries reinforce the status quo of mass incarceration. This forum will also scrutinize how various corporations beyond media and entertainment fuel what activists deem "the prison industrial complex." Visit the facebook event page here!

4/12/14 Rap Sessions Video below:



Rights, Resources and Bolivia’s “Proceso de Cambio” | February 28, 2014

Feb 28, 2014
1pm - 5pm
Logan Center, Performance Penthouse, 9th floor



Screening & discussion of the documentary film “American Promise” | March 3, 2014

Mar 3, 2014
7pm - 10:30pm
International House, Assembly Hall

American Promise is an intimate and provocative account, recorded over 12 years, of the experiences of two middle-class African-American boys who entered a very prestigious - and historically white - private school on Manhattan's Upper East Side. The boys’ parents found themselves struggling not only with kids' typical growing pains and the kinds of racial issues one might expect, but also with surprising class, gender and generational gaps.
 
Persons with disabilities who may need assistance should contact the Office of Programs & External Relations at 773-753-2274



Black Radical Imagination - curated by Amir George & Erin Christovale | February 27, 2014

Feb 27, 2014
6:00PM - 8:00PM
Columbus Auditorium, 280 S. Columbus Dr. & Arts Incubator, 301 E. Garfield Blvd., 2nd Floor Flex Space



Neoliberalism, Capitalism, and Race in the 21st Century | November 21, 2013

Nov 21, 2013
4:30pm - 6:30pm
Center for the Study of Race, Politics & Culture - 5733 S. University Ave, 1st Floor Community Room

 

Chair: Michael C. Dawson, Professor of Political Science, University of Chicago

Discussant: Michael Ralph, Assistant Professor and Academic Director, Social and Cultural Analysis, New York University

Panelists: Loic Wacquant, Professor of Sociology, University of California, Berkeley | Megan M. Francis, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Pepperdine University | Keeanga Taylor, Postdoctoral Research Associate of African American Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.



Politics of Race, Immigration, and Ethnicity Consortium (PRIEC) - 35th Meeting | October 18, 2013

Oct 18, 2013
8:00am - 5:00pm
Center for the Study of Race, Politics & Culture - 5733 S. University Ave, 1st Floor Event Space

The Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture (CSRPC) at the University of Chicago (U of C) is excited to host the 35th meeting of the Politics of Race, Immigration, and Ethnicity Consortium (PRIEC) this fall (October 18th). PRIEC can best be described as a CSRPC Workshop that condenses a quarter of presentations into a single day.  Traditionally PRIEC meetings have been a regional fixture in Southern California at the University of California, Riverside; site of its institutional home.  However, with the increase of new faculty and graduate students that probe questions concerning race, immigration, and ethnicity, PRIEC has also broadened its scope and made itself more accessible to universities across the western hemisphere from Washington to Arizona and New Mexico.  The consortium’s main requirement is that research projects focus on some aspect of politics.  PRIEC is open to all disciplines and research methodologies. Karthick Ramakrishnan, Associate Professor of Political Science at University of California, Riverside,  has cultivated an environment where graduate students at any stage and faculty from every rank can come together and provide thoughtful feedback to experts in the field. PRIEC’s meeting at the U of C offers graduate students and faculty another forum to address questions that focus on immigration and its correlation to race and ethnicity in conversation with top scholars in the field.



CSRPC/CSGS Open House | October 16, 2013

Oct 16, 2013
4:00pm - 6:00pm
Centers for Race Studies/Gender - 5733 South University, 1st Floor



Dr. Angela Y. Davis | May 3, 2013

May 3, 2013
7:30PM - 9:00PM
Rockefeller Memorial Chapel - 5850 S. Woodlawn, Chicago, IL 60637

Feminisim and Abolition: Theories & Practices for the 21st Century

Through her activism and scholarship over many decades, Angela Davis has been deeply involved in movements for social justice around the world. Her work as an educator – both at the university level and in the larger public sphere – has always emphasized the importance of building communities of struggle for economic, racial, and gender justice.

Angela Davis is the Distinguished Professor Emerita of History of Consciousness and Feminist Studies, University of California Santa Cruz and founding member of Critical Resistance, a national organization dedicated to the dismantling of the prison industrial complex. Internationally, she is affiliated with Sisters Inside, an abolitionist organization based in Queensland, Australia that works in solidarity with women in prison.

Professor Davis is the author of nine books and has lectured throughout the United States as well as in Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia, and South America. In recent years a persistent theme of her work has been the range of social problems associated with incarceration and the generalized criminalization of those communities that are most affected by poverty and racial discrimination. She draws upon her own experiences in the early seventies as a person who spent eighteen months in jail and on trial, after being placed on the FBI's "Ten Most Wanted List." She also has conducted extensive research on numerous issues related to race, gender and imprisonment. Her recent books include Abolition Democracy and Are Prisons Obsolete? about the abolition of the prison industrial complex, and a new edition of Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. In 2012 she published a new collection of essays entitled The Meaning of Freedom.

Like many educators, Professor Davis is especially concerned with the general tendency to devote more resources and attention to the prison system than to educational institutions. Having helped to popularize the notion of a "prison industrial complex," she now urges her audiences to think seriously about the future possibility of a world without prisons and to help forge a 21st century abolitionist movement.

This event is a collaboration between the the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality (CSGS) and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture (CSRPC). Davis' lecture culminates a year-long series on the theory and praxis of her work and re-inaugurates the CSRPC Annual Public Lecture.

Co-sponsored by the Department of Political Science, Office of Multicultural Student Affairs and Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory.